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x-men writer
Writer/Producer Simon Kinberg has his hands in a lot of pies. In addition to being one of the writers and producers on next month's "X-Men: Days of Future Past" (and the already-announced sequel "X-Men: Apocalypse"), Kinberg has co-written and is producing Fox's big "Fantastic Four" redo, slated for release next year, and is a key player in the new "Star Wars" movies for Disney. So, yes, quite busy. But he's still got time to dream. And dream big.

While chatting with Coming Soon over the weekend at Anaheim's WonderCon, Kinberg was asked about the recent revelation that an "X-Men: Days of Future Past" tag was inserted at the end of "Amazing Spider-Man 2," Kinberg spoke about his desire to see the entire superhero franchise come together like a delicious chocolate-and-vanilla swirled ice cream cone.

Also, he compared himself to a legendary, slain civil rights leader.

"Listen, I would love it. The dream to me - I almost feel like Martin Luther King or somebody. I see a world where everyone is joined together. The dream is, obviously, one day to do a Marvel movie that is with all the Marvel characters or at least a universe where they can dive in and out of one another's films. Because that's the way the comics were created, I think that's the way the movies should actually be," Kinberg told Coming Soon.

Kinberg also said that he firmly believes that "Captain America: The Winter Soldier," "Amazing Spider-Man 2" and "X-Men: Days of Future Past" will be three of the biggest movies of the summer, and that there's no reason that they shouldn't intermingle since they're clearly not cannibalizing one another at the box office (keep in mind that, in America at least, "Captain America 2" reigned at No. 1 for the third straight weekend).

While Kinberg's vision is a wonderful one, it also seems totally unfeasible (even, as Kinberg suggests, the mash-ups start on television and then continue on the big screen). There are just too many personalities and politics involved for that to ever become a reality. Also, the producer of "This Means War" compared himself to Martin Luther King Jr. when discussing comic book movies. Can we just have that marinate for a minute?

Photo courtesy Fox