CATEGORIES Movies

oscars music concertAlberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Disney

For the first time ever, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is hosting a concert honoring all the nominees for Best Original Score and Best Original Song before the Oscars telecast.

The Oscar Concert will take place just days before the March 2 Oscars ceremony, and feature orchestral performances of the nominated scores, as well as vocal performances of the four nominated songs. The show is open to the public.

"We expect to have a full house very quickly because it's really a one-of-a-kind concert," said academy music branch governor Charles Fox. "It's never been done before and it's featuring some of the world's best composers."

Those composers will conduct an 80-piece orchestra "suite" of their nominated scores, described by the New York Daily News as "a composition that uses elements from the film score, [composed] specifically for the show." Composers will also offer a brief discussion of their work.

The lineup includes: John Williams with "The Book Thief"; Arcade Fire's William Butler and Owen Pallett with "Her"; Thomas Newman with "Saving Mr. Banks"; Steven Price with "Gravity"; and Alexandre Desplat with "Philomena."

In addition to the scores, R&B artist Jill Scott will perform "Happy" from "Despicable Me 2," and songwriters Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez will perform their composition "Let It Go" from "Frozen." Performers of the remaining two Best Original Song nominees, "Moon Song" from "Her" and "Ordinary Love" from "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom," have yet to be announced.

Though the Oscar Concert won't be broadcast on television this year, Fox said that there are plans to do so in the future, as well as make the concert available in cinecast (projected in movie theaters).

"We hope it's going to be an annual thing because every year there's such a great level of quality music being written for film, and it goes out to the whole world," Fox said.

The Oscar Concert will take place on February 27 at UCLA's Royce Hall. Tickets are $75 and $100 and available on Ticketmaster.