'Frozen' Preview - That Happened
Disney's "Frozen," which opens at the end of next month, is the kind of classic animated fable that Walt himself would have loved. In fact, the movie, based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale "The Snow Queen," was something that Walt attempted in the post-War days but couldn't quite get a handle on. This new telling, co-directed by Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck, is splendid and sumptuous and bold, the kind of glittery 3D confection that makes you feel like a kid again, if only for the 90 minutes or so that the movie is unspooling.

Quite frankly, the wait until November 27 should feel like agony, if it doesn't already. Thankfully, we have an exclusive clip to hold you over. And it's a good one.

In the sequence, our plucky hero Anna (Kristen Bell) and her oafish sidekick Kristoff (Jonathan Groff) have attempted to reconcile with Anna's sister, Elsa (Idina Menzel), who has frozen the kingdom with her icy magic powers. After being run out of her silvery palace, they are chased by an abominable snowman of her creation (that our heroes nickname Marshmallow). In the sequence, which we're premiering exclusively, Kristoff and Anna are making a hasty retreat, with their lovable snowman sidekick Olaf (Josh Gad) trailing right behind. And as you can see, Marshmallow is one tough cookie (no corncob pipe for this fellow).

Even in this brief clip, you can see that Olaf is going to be a runaway fan favorite. It's great when he's presented with his monstrous counterpart and he says, "We were just talking about you... All good things, all good things..."

You also get a chance to get some of the romantic banter between Kristoff and Anna, which is some first-rate screwball stuff (except with a lot more snow). The two have to scale a perilous mountain cliff and they still have time for some witty back-and-forth. It's pretty great. The visual gag of Kristoff's outline made of falling snow is totally amazing, too.

We'll have more from "Frozen" before it's November 27 release, and each piece will, like a snowflake, be totally unique (we hope).