Movie stars ... they think they're so cool with their red carpet premieres and A-list girlfriends and fancy-schmancy sports cars. Don't they realize that they're just human beings like the rest of us? Well, as it turns out, some of them do.

There is no better example of this than Harry Potter himself, Daniel Radcliffe. Radcliffe was 11 when he first began shooting the franchise that would go on to shape the rest of his adolescence. But instead of going the burnout/rehab/self-destruction route so many child actors end up taking (looking at you, Macaulay Culkin), Radcliffe has managed to stay relatively modest and even-keeled over the last decade, and there is no greater proof of this than in his interviews.

The British actor has never been one to brag or boast about his success, which is nice. However, sometimes it's like, "Dude, you play Harry frickin' Potter. Enjoy yourself!" Unfortunately, there's probably little we can do at this point to change his mind.

Therefore, we give you Daniel Radcliffe's Most Painfully Modest Statements:

On being snubbed for a Tony Award:
"It's such a competitive year, particularly in that category - in male leading ... There's so many of us this year. The fact that I'm even being talked about in the same circles of some of the people who have been nominated ... is amazing to me."

On being cast as Harry Potter :
"Whoever stepped into that was going to receive a certain amount of attention and -- dare I say -- adulation. Which is not, in my opinion, justified, because I know me ... I'm not anything special or big to fuss about."

[via Movieline]

On his obliviousness to money :
"I really am a pretty normal guy and I don't have a fleet of Ferraris." Instead, his ­transport is a VW Golf, which he says is "the perfect car for zipping around."

[via Mirror]

On being 11 years old and having screaming-girl fans
:
'You laugh off a lot of it. You have to dismiss it as being ridiculous. And realize they're not there for you, they're there because you play this character. If I play another role, there won't be 5,000 people to greet me at an airport. It's Harry more than me. And as long as you make that distinction, it's easier to cope with it. It's only when you start to believe you're as good as they think you are and you're somehow above the rest of humanity that things go badly wrong.'

On trying to go see concerts and being an "old man"
'[I don't go] as much as I want to. It's hard because I'm knackered at the end of the day and I just want to go home. Glass of wine and I go to bed. A friend often says I'm an old man in a young man's husk. I like that. I am old-fashioned in some ways.'

[via Time Out]

On ever having the desire (or lack thereof) to direct a Harry Potter film
:
"Oh God no, not at all. Never, never, never. Absolutely not. I don't want to direct until I've learned a lot more than I know now and if I ever do I think I'd like to start with something less ambitious. Short films rather than this big $280-million-or-whatever-budget-these-things-have movie. I don't think that'd be a good place to start!"

On whether shooting Harry Potter got dull over time:
"I'm here doing a job that I love and I get to see some of my best friends every day at work. I'm incredibly lucky and I do still get excited to come to work and I still do get wowed by some of the sets that I see."

[via IGN]

On being modest (again) about his role as Harry Potter
:
"I think the most important thing for me to remember is that it doesn't matter who would've got this part, they would be receiving this kind of attention ... when you step out of a car at a premiere and you hit that wall of noise and screaming, it's very important for me to remember that they would be screaming for somebody else had he got the part. It's not about me, it's about the franchise and the character. So that I have to kind of think about a lot to help keep it in perspective and stop myself from getting big-headed.

[via The Hollywood Reporter]