50. 'Adventures in Babysitting' (1987)
The scene: The gang sings 'The Babysitting Blues'

"Nobody gets out of this place without singing the blues," says legendary musician Albert Collins, kicking off a movie moment that infused an '80s teen comedy with some real Chicago blues. Elisabeth Shue was never more crush-worthy than in this sequence; it is her energetic performance alone that saves this scene from being lost to time. -- Eric Larnick

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49. 'The Deer Hunter' (1978)
The scene: 'Can't Take My Eyes Off of You' at the bar

You can't see the ugly fallout of war and the devastation it leaves on family and friends without witnessing the innocence that is lost. One of the last peaceful moments in an epic story that rips lives apart through bloodshed and abuse, this bar-room romp between a band of brothers only becomes more poignant as the fates of the characters are revealed. -- Eric Larnick

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48. 'Sid & Nancy' (1986)
The scene: Sid "shoots" a video for 'My Way'

Serving as a bittersweet coda to one of rock and roll's weirdest love stories, Gary Oldman's Sid Vicious delivers the perfect snarling send-off to anyone who may or may not give a damn about him and Nancy Spungen. If you don't get it, that's not the movie's problem. It's violent, it's funny and it's the perfect punk note to go out on. -- Eric Larnick

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47. 'The Fabulous Baker Boys' (1989)
The scene: 'Makin' Whoopee' atop a piano

Michelle Pfeiffer reached arguably the pinnacle of her career -- and sex appeal -- with this seductive take on Eddie Cantor's 'Makin' Whoopee.' Sitting on top of a piano, Pfeiffer had audiences' eyes glued and jaws floored with a performance so sexy that even Catwoman would have been impressed. Remind us again why she lost the Oscar to Jessica Tandy? -- Andrew Scott

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46. 'Reality Bites' (1994)
The scene: Gen-Xers dance ironically at Food Mart

Few movies captured the post-college slacker malaise better than 'Reality Bites' -- even if all there is to capture is that feeling of getting stoned, going to a late-night convenience store and falling back in love with a song you used to listen to all the time. "Could you turn this up, please?" says the character played by Janeane Garofalo to the cashier. "You won't be sorry." So perfect was the use of 'My Sharona' in this scene that it put the song back on the Billboard Hot 100. -- Eric Larnick

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45. 'Beetlejuice' (1988)
The scene: Dinner guests possessed by song

Few music scenes in the history of movies are as joyfully ridiculous as the dinner-time 'Day-O (The Banana Boat Song)' number. Featuring Catharine O'Hara, Jeffrey Jones and cocktail shrimp at their comedic peaks, the scene introduced Harry Belafonte to a new generation and encapsulated Tim Burton's darkly humorous sensibilities in a sublime manner. -- Eric Larnick

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44. 'Hustle & Flow' (2005)
The scene: Improvising leads to 'Whoop That Trick'

This song didn't win the Oscar (that was, of course, 'Hard Out Here for a Pimp') but 'Whoop That Trick' marks the moment that the movie comes alive. As we watch the birth of a beat, Terrence Howard, Anthony Anderson and D.J. Qualls bounce off each other and fill the room with musical energy, until it bursts out the door and hooks everyone else in the house. It also hooks everyone watching the movie; the gritty hip-hop anthem sticks in your head and becomes an unforgettable rallying cry. -- Eric Larnick

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43. 'Office Space' (1999)
The scene: Fax-machine destruction

Even the whitest cubicle worker has a little thug in him, and the most over-the-top sequence in one of the driest comedies of the 1990s somehow achieves the rare effect of getting us to laugh with that nerdy white boy, instead of at him. 'Office Space' picks apart the soul-crushing tedium of work, and this scene's legendary fax-machine beatdown illustrates that we all wish our lives were as cool as a music video. -- Eric Larnick

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42. 'The Bridge on the River Kwai' (1957)
The scene: The whistle march

The name of the ditty Alec Guinness and friends are whistling as they trudge into the prisoner-of-war camp is 'Colonel Bogey March,' written in 1914 by a British Army lieutenant. Not heard in the film, because they were deemed too risqué, are the song's unofficial lyrics, adopted by soldiers during World War II. Try to sing along now: "Hitler has only got one ball/Göring had two but very small ..." -- John Sellers

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41. 'American Psycho' (2000)
The scene: Huey Lewis carnage

Re-watching this scene offers a handy reminder of why Christian Bale is a superstar. His manic, too-perfect portrayal of Patrick Bateman is nothing more than a façade; what he really is is an inhuman freak unable to operate in a normal society. His alien-like joy for a Huey Lewis track is more unnerving than his homicidal tendencies. -- Eric Larnick

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40. 'Pulp Fiction' (1994)
The scene: Dancing at Jack Rabbit Slim's

It's arguably the grooviest scene in the grooviest movie of the 1990s, and it could very well be the reason young people started to take John Travolta seriously again. It's definitely the reason Uma Thurman gets a free pass for everything she does. Anyway, we still like it. We would like to call a moratorium on people mimicking their retro moves on the dance floor, though. Especially that two-fingers-across-the-eyes thing. Like, seriously. -- Eric Larnick

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39. 'Coming to America' (1988)
The scene: "Give it up for my band, Sexual Chocolate"

Sorry, Whitney Houston, but 23 years later, Eddie Murphy's emotive version of 'Greatest Love of All' is the only one that matters. -- John Sellers

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38. 'Annie Hall' (1977)
The scene: Annie sings 'Seems Like Old Times'

With her quirky outfits and "la-di-da" attitude, it was hard not to fall in love with Diane Keaton in 'Annie Hall.' The brilliance of her performance is perfectly captured in her take on 'Seems Like Old Times,' which represents everything that made Annie so special: She's sexy and brave, yet innocent and a bit naive. And when the song is played again over the film's final montage, in which Annie and Alvy (Woody Allen) meet again after their painful breakup, it's both sad and uplifting, if only because it reminds us of how unique she really was. Love is too weak a word to describe how we feel about Keaton's number; we lurved her, loaved her, luffed her. -- Andrew Scott

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37. 'The Wedding Singer' (1998)
The scene: "Don't you talk to Billy Idol that way!"

Back when he was still marginally believable as a romantic lead, Adam Sandler charmed the pants off Drew Barrymore's earnest character with this airplane serenade that excellently features the comedy of snarling singer Billy Idol. Cue the white wedding. -- John Sellers

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36. '8 Mile' (2002)
The scene: Rabbit schools Papa Doc

Eminem used the rap battle scenes in '8 Mile' to showcase his immense talents -- and this one is the mother of them all. The intensity in Eminem's eyes as the battle is about to begin hints at something big, but the build-up can't capture how massively Rabbit dispatches his rival, Papa Doc (Anthony Mackie). His lyrics acknowledge everything hard he's gone through; it gets even more glorious when they cut the beat and Em goes a capella, shouting the basic truth of his whole character: "I'm a piece of f*cking white trash! I say it proudly!" When the room rightfully blows up, Rabbit -- and through him, Eminem -- finally redeems himself. -- Gabrielle Dunn

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35. 'Blue Velvet' (1986)
The scene: Dean Stockwell lip-synchs Roy Orbison

You can't really define the term "Lynchian," but we'll try. It's bizarre, it's retro, it's so uncomfortably American that you can't go back to the way things were before you saw it. Dean Stockwell's vampy lip-synch for his captive audience is the moment David Lynch sunk his hooks into our collective subconscious. It's the blueprint Lynchian moment. -- Eric Larnick

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34. 'Some Like It Hot' (1959)
The scene: Marilyn Monroe goes "Boo-boopy-doo"

When it comes to heating up the big screen, nobody did it quite as memorably as Marilyn Monroe in 'Some Like It Hot.' Moviegoers were given an especially seductive treat when Monroe -- who played the adorably sexy Sugar Kane Kowalczyk -- took to the stage in a revealing gown to sing 'I Wanna Be Loved by You.' By the end of her number, you weren't alive if you weren't head-over-heels in love with the blonde bombshell; more like everyone likes it hot. -- Andrew Scott

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33. '10 Things I Hate About You' (1999)
The scene: Heath Ledger serenades campus

Even before Ledger's untimely passing, this classic crooning moment just felt like it was on a higher level than other turn-of-the-millennium teen cinema moments. Heath's energy and showmanship -- not to mention big hair -- was undeniable in this winning moment from a simple Shakespeare-inspired story about teenage love. He didn't merely steal the show, he grabbed the attention of everyone in America. (And yes, this is the second time 'Can't Take My Eyes Off of You' has appeared on this list; deal with it.) -- Eric Larnick

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32. 'The Silence of the Lambs' (1991)
The scene: Buffalo Bill prances disturbingly

As Clarice Starling puts together the pieces of Buffalo Bill's heinous crimes, you start to feel more uncomfortable with every detail. Every moment you spend with the deranged killer gets heavier and heavier until we share a private moment with him -- and that's when he reveals all his secret id-filled desires. It's utterly bizarre and, it almost goes without saying, absolutely NSFW. -- Eric Larnick

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31. 'Shaun of the Dead' (2004)
The scene: Zombies attack during Queen

Zombie-killing has never been more terrifyingly fun than during this jukebox head-bashing. Directed with pinpoint rhythmic timing by Edgar Wright, this scene's mash-up of post-modern pop-culture and genuine horror-movie scares achieves a glorious comedic combo -- thanks to 'Don't Stop Me Now,' one of Queen's most underrated songs. -- Eric Larnick

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30. 'The Man Who Knew Too Much' (1956)
The scene: Doris Day belts out a tune

The Oscar-winning song 'Que Sera Sera' is used throughout Hitchcock's classic 1956 remake, but it packs its biggest emotional punch near the end of the film, when the marrieds played by Doris Day and Jimmy Stewart are invited to stay at the ambassador's home, where their kidnapped son, Hank, is being held hostage. It is there where Hank hears Day sing the song before an audience and proceeds to whistle the tune so that Stewart can hopefully find and rescue him. It's the perfect blending of song and plot, and a good reminder of how well Day can carry a tune. -- Andrew Scott

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29. 'My Best Friend's Wedding' (1997)
The scene: Group singing in a crowded restaurant

Sure, it's corny, and something that would only happen in a romantic comedy. But that's part of what makes this rendition of Dionne Warwick's 'I Say a Little Prayer' so good. At first glance, it's a light and breezy escape from the plot, but if you listen closely, it also drives home the moral dilemma of the movie -- that Jules' (Julia Roberts') attempt to break up Dermot Mulroney and Cameron Diaz, not to mention her attempt to fake a relationship with Rupert Everett, is probably ridiculous. Plus, at the end of the day, it's just a lot of fun to watch. (Admit it: If you had lunch with Rupert Everett and he started singing, you'd totally join in.) -- Andrew Scott

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28. 'Do the Right Thing' (1989)
The scene: Radio Raheem orders pizza

As the owner of the second-best boombox appearing on this list (see Dobler, Lloyd), Radio Raheem earns bonus points for his single-minded devotion to Public Enemy's 'Fight the Power.' The philosophical giant has already infused multiple scenes and street corners with the raw vocal stylings of Flava Flav and Chuck D and no one complained, but then he enters Sal's for "Two slices" and learns a lesson of his own -- namely, that extra cheese is $2. -- John Sellers

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27. 'The Big Chill' (1983)
The scene: Baby boomers dance to Motown

'Nuff said. -- John Sellers

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26. 'Boogie Nights' (1997)
The scene: A drug deal gone sour -- set to awesome '80s music

Attempting to scam drug dealers is a ploy savvy moviegoers can see coming from a mile away. But Paul Thomas Anderson soaks the scene in cocaine-filled paranoia worthy of the early 1980s, and adds on a three-song mixtape of gooey Reagan-era songs -- 'Sister Christian,' 'Jessie's Girl' and '99 Luftballons' -- to heighten the lunacy of the predicament the characters have gotten themselves into. By the end of the scene, one thing is clear: Alfred Molina rules. -- Eric Larnick

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