First came 'Pirates of the Caribbean' and the world scoffed. After all, who'd want to see a movie based off of a theme park ride? A couple hundred million dollars later, the answer to that question seemed to be everyone. Since that initial venture though, Disney theme park adaptations have had a less than stellar history, with 'The Haunted Mansion' bombing at the the box office (another one is now being planned) and a proposed 'Jungle Cruise' movie never getting off the ground.

Still, the success of the 'Pirates' series has kept these properties hot and big-name directors are hopping on the bandwagon. Guillermo Del Toro trying his own take at the 'Haunted Mansion'? Yes, please. Jon Favreau doing 'Magic Kingdom,' presumably based off the entire titular theme park? Um, okay. But what's next?

How about a movie adaptation of 'The Museum of the Weird,' an attraction that Walt Disney himself endorsed in the 1960s, but was never actually completed?
The story comes from the LA Times, who note that the attraction would have featured "a parade of ghostly organists, magic carts, talking chairs and other surreal exhibits" and would have been a companion attraction to the Haunted Mansion (complete with restaurant). It's impossible to extrapolate a full-fledged plot from such an unfinished concept, but the immediate image that springs to mind is 'Night at the Museum' -- although with a title like 'Museum of the Weird,' one would hope Disney will actually go truly weird with this concept instead of settling for a generic kiddie flick.

This won't be hitting theaters for some time (a script doesn't even exist yet), but it showcases Disney's willingness to go back to the theme park ride well in a big way. At least they seem ready and willing to attach genuine talent to these projects (in addition to Del Toro and Favreau, they have David Fincher attached to a new version of '20,000 Leagues Under the Sea'), which gives us hope for a Ridley Scott-directed 'Space Mountain' and Zack Snyder's 'Big Thunder Mountain Railroad' in 2014.