CATEGORIES Movies, Cinematical
We may chide the Internet for its porn and anti-social tendencies, but the world wide web can also be a force of wicked positive change.

In the wake of a string of bully-induced suicides, an Anti-Bullying Week post over at Chicago Now has brought together the power of the geek girl to help a bullied first-grader. Carrie Goldman recounts the story where her adorable first-grader, Katie, went to the store to pick out some school supplies, and after much deliberation, she picked a 'Star Wars' water bottle to match her 'Star Wars' backpack.

She loved her new bottle until a few months in, when Katie asked for a different water bottle under the guise that the one she had wasn't big enough. After searching through cabinets, she chose a pink one that was smaller. Mom pressed on the issue until the kid broke down and said: "The first grade boys are teasing me at lunch because I have a 'Star Wars' water bottle. They say it's only for boys. Every day they make fun of me for drinking out of it. I want them to stop, so I'll just bring a pink water bottle."

Naturally, this has fueled a call to arms for the legions of writers on the Internet, who want to make sure little Katie realizes how cool she is, while also pointing out just how early bullying starts, and the distinct gender barriers still instilled in young children when everyone should know better. EPBOT asked for geek girls to activate for this cause and it's spread like wildfire, catching the attention of geek princess Felicia Day and Star Wars Blog queen, Bonnie Burton, who wrote her own piece on the matter.

The original post has been flooded with positive comments, which get read to little Katie every night to help her feel more secure about her too-cool 'Star Wars' love:
"Today she wore a Star Wars shirt to school and said to me, 'Tell the people about it!!!!' This is really restoring her self confidence. She did a jaunty little pirouette in her 'Star Wars' shirt before school."

It's a lesson for all of us, how "boys do this" and "girls do that" comments quickly burn into a child's psyche, at a very young age. But at least this one has a happy ending, so that years later when Katie's got some super cool job, maybe as the voice of geeks worldwide, she can talk about the time when the web came together in geeky solidarity to give her confidence.