CATEGORIES Movies, Cinematical
The Twilight Sage: Eclipse

Attention, all die-hard 'Twilight' fans: Do not dream of sneaking onto studio property to catch a glimpse of your favorite star(s) working on the next installment of the series, unless you want to risk imprisonment at hard labor for up to six years. That's right: six years! (And a fine of up to $1,000.) You'd have to wait until 2016 to see what happens in the movies!

'The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1'
began filming in Louisiana this week, but the cast, notably stars Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson, and Taylor Lautner, will have a small army protecting them, according to Scene Magazine. Bella, Edward and Jacob each have their own personal bodyguard and the production employs a security team that will double the force that has been hired at Raleigh Studios in Baton Rouge. In sum, about 100 people will be guarding the cast, crew and production facilities. And if you're still tempted, the head of security wants you know that trespassing at Raleigh Studios is a felony, not a misdemeanor. He also says that teenage girls are not exempt from prosecution: "You wouldn't want somebody trespassing in your home, and if you did, you'd defend yourself. That's what we're doing here, it doesn't matter who it is."

The fan frenzy has been steadily building for years and security challenges have become bigger with each film. Security was breached recently in Brazil when a TV show managed to sneak onto location for 'Breaking Dawn' and then aired footage of Pattinson and Stewart preparing to shoot a scene. (See Twilight Poison for more on that story.) So security concerns are real. The next trespasser might be a Twilighter wishing to see Bella, Edward or Jacob in person, or a member of the media seeking publicity and "exclusive" photos. Or it might be someone wishing to do harm. You never know.

Our recommendation: Be patient and wait a year for 'The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1' to hit theaters on November 18, 2011. Or be prepared to go to jail and do hard labor in Louisiana for six years.