CATEGORIES Movies, Cinematical
Over the summer, Angelina Jolie announced that she was going to write and direct a romance set during the Bosnian War. It would be a "low-budget tale of a Bosnian woman who falls in love with a Serbian military man," that's "not a political statement." But that statement wasn't enough to assuage fears over the problematic nature of a love story that must transcend mass rape and ethnic cleansing. In October, Jolie's film permit was revoked as Bakira Hasecic, president of the Women Victims of War association, said: "In the film, a victim is really falling in love with her torturer." The permit matter was handled quietly, and Jolie got back on track.

Now reports reveal further problems as women assaulted during the Bosnian War continue to protest.

The Hollywood Reporter posts that Jolie has had to cut short her production days in Bosnia, dialing back from ten to three or four. Well, production days for her crew -- the actress-turned-filmmaker will only briefly visit this set, as many of the scenes will be filmed in Hungary instead. Her supposed Luke-and-Laura story still has victims up in arms, and on top of letters with the women's association, she plans to meet with them during her visit "to personally clear up any misunderstandings about this project."

Though the vague, one-liner shows the possibility of a 'North and South' type affair where friendship -- or in this case, love -- clashes with civic duty, it's interesting that Jolie continues to handle these matters privately and silently. Garnering a bunch of bad buzz before your modest film has a chance to hit screens is not good for PR, and if there's information that can settle everyone's fears, one has to wonder why she doesn't reveal it to everyone. Whether this is just Jolie's M.O., or she is trying to avoid pre-production spoilers, remains to be seen.

Regardless, the film continues forward, and while Jolie is staying behind the camera, Us Magazine reports that Brad Pitt will be an extra. He plays a soldier who is shot to death, in a gig so brief that it's likely audiences could miss him entirely.