Christopher Nolan's
dream-within-a-dream saga 'Inception' has endured its fair share of criticism since the movie's release this summer. While many have hailed the film as a visual masterpiece and a true original, others have noted similarities between 'Inception' and a handful of other films like 1984's 'Dreamscape' and the 2006 anime 'Paprika.' Now, 'Burke & Hare' director John Landis is adding his vote to the "not original" category by stating that he doesn't think Nolan's latest is anything new.

Landis had this to say about the film: "Interestingly enough 'Inception,' which is wonderful, is not original. There have been a lot of movies like it; remember 'Dreamscape?' Oh that's bad special effects but almost the same movie. It's Dennis Quaid and Edward Albert is the president of the United States and they insert him into his dreams." Do we remember 'Dreamscape,' Landis? Of course we do -- the snake-man was terrifying to young eyes.

The 'Blues Brothers' and 'American Werewolf in London' director then goes on to say, "Ya know, I think, don't misunderstand me I think Christopher Nolan is a wonderful director it's just I don't think he is yet to make a movie other than 'Memento' that I thought was really original, its just very stylish."

And for those of you who believe that Landis is just jealous of Nolan's success with the summer blockbuster, he tries to cool the pot with this statement: "He's a lucky guy, I'm glad for him; I love the fact that he can continue to make his movies. Whether he makes a couple of unsuccessful ones in a row, he'll be in the same situation as everybody else. More power to him I like smart filmmakers and I think he's great."

See everyone? Landis clearly admires Nolan and the fanboy army should put down their Bat-a-rangs and not set out to lynch the guy for insulting the honor of their beloved auteur. Landis is famous for off the cuff remarks about a myriad of things, so these latest comments aren't that unusual.

Have audiences wrung the 'Inception's' originality debate completely dry? Do you side with Landis on this, or do you admire Nolan's ability to pay homage to his influences while creating engaging new cinema in the process?
CATEGORIES Cinematical, Movies