With the quality of disaster films plummeting, it's baffling that we can still get excited when word gets out that there's another one on the way. Yet that's exactly why studios keep churning these films out; regardless of quality, there's something about a movie depicting mass destruction that's wildly appealing to moviegoers and I'm certainly no exception.

However, the topic of this article isn't just a run-of-the-mill destruction concept aiming to drown a weak story in CGI; this one actually has some depth. With the Gulf coast still feeling the effects of Hurricane Katrina, it's easy to forget there was ever a storm as deadly. But, back in 1900, a hurricane made landfall in Galveston, Texas and didn't subside until it claimed about 8,000 lives. Not only was the loss of life devastating, but the storm destroyed what was once known as the "Wall Street of the Southwest." This Category 4 storm will be the subject of Warner Bros' upcoming disaster film.

According to THR, the studio snatched up Daniel Sussman's script, 'Galveston,' which tells the stories of several individuals with the hurricane in the backdrop. There's a young couple facing separation, a power struggle involving various bureaucracies and a love triangle in which two of the parties are brothers. The idea came from Polly Johnsen and she's on board to produce the film through her company, Polymorphic Pictures. Sarah Schecter and Chris Gary will keep an eye on the project for Warner Bros.

This is a concept that can seriously freshen up the genre. After Roland Emmerich packed on the clichés, special effects and every other typical disaster film element you can think of in '2012,' we're in desperate need for a studio to take a step back and take a more serious approach to this type of film. I'd like to believe that going with a project based on a true story would mean we've got a piece focusing far more on the story than on the disastrous events. Should 'Galveston' really get into the details of its characters' situations, perhaps there will be far more to the hurricane's arrival and imminent path of destruction than some animated wind, rain and waves.
CATEGORIES Cinematical, Movies