CATEGORIES Cinematical
Frank Miller may not be a "historian" in the strictest sense of the word, but who needs to be hung up on what really happened when you can read tales of days past with lots of butt-kicking mixed in to spice things up? Let's face it, The Cuban Missile Crisis would have been a hundred times more exciting in Miller's universe -- where a 'roided out JFK would have gone mano-y-mano with a bug-eyed Khrushchev while nuclear warheads flew in the background. Just look at '300.' Is it historically accurate? Not exactly. Spartans and Persians did square off, but Miller definitely made it far more exciting than any history book thanks to his "factual liberties."

The guys at CollegeHumor get this, and have concluded that we need Frank Miller to make more historical epics as only he can. To help him out, they've envisioned several potential projects for the famed author and artist. Let's hope Miller takes these ideas to heart. Who wouldn't want to line up to see an angry Martin Luther drive one of his 95 Theses into the chest of a church official in Miller's adaptation entitled '95?'

How about 'Frank Miller's Lincoln the Emancipator?' That one finds our 16th President slugging it out with John Wilkes Booth. There's just gotta be a "I'll be kicking your ass for the next four score and seven years" line in there somewhere.

If watching Honest Abe lay the smackdown on his assassin isn't your bag, but you still want to be patriotic, then perhaps 'Betsy Ross: Scars and Stripes' will be up your alley. In Miller's world, Ross goes from demure seamstress and creator of the American flag to riot-grrl armed with a sword and a paintbrush for spreading the blood of her foes.

College Humor doesn't stop there -- turning their focus to Rosa Parks, Marie Antoinette and Marie Curie as well. You can check a few of their ideas below. Someone needs to forward this article to Miller posthaste -- he's got a lot of work to do. It's all going to be worth it in the end, when an entire generation of American students discover a newfound love for history thanks to Miller's efforts.