When the list of directors being considered to direct 'The Hunger Games' movie was revealed, David Slade stood out immediately. While I was certain he was the man for the job, I also mentioned that all of the options would make for fine a helmer. Well, I lied. According to Deadline, Gary Ross is the candidate in early talks for the gig and I'm somewhat disappointed.

With darker material like '30 Days of Night' under his belt and having had a great teen-friendly franchise experience with 'The Twilight Saga: Eclipse', it just made sense for Slade to get the position. On the bright side, if I had to choose between Ross and the other contenders - Sam Mendes, Andrew Adamson, Rupert Sanders and Susanna White – I'd chose Ross in a heartbeat. In terms of directing, Ross is two for two. He directed the 1998 film 'Pleasantville' as well as the Academy Award nominated 'Seabiscuit'. I wouldn't say either proves Ross can handle the subject matter in 'The Hunger Games', but they do justify the guy is a top notch director and worthy of the job.

Those of you who are unfamiliar with Suzanne Collins' book might be wondering: What's the big deal with this film anyway. Well, first off, you shouldn't be asking that question; you should go pick up the book. It's a downright fantastic read and the book's loyal fan base proves it. Lionsgate and Color Force's Nina Jacobson have a potential franchise on their hands and they know it. Collins was able to draw readers of all ages in for the first installment and kept them hooked with the second, 'Catching Fire,'and the recently released series finale, 'Mockingjay.'

The key here is going to be appeasing fans of the book and moviegoers with no knowledge of the source material, just like with 'Harry Potter' and 'The Twilight Saga.' Now that we've just about got a director – I really can't imagine Ross not coming to an acceptable arrangement with Lionsgate – casting is top priority, particularly when it comes to the series' star, Katniss Everdeen. In the country of Panem, each of the 12 districts are forced to send one boy and one girl between the ages of 12 and 18 to the country's televised battle to the death, the Hunger Games. In the first book, it's an unlucky year for Katniss and she must travel to the Capitol to compete in the games on behalf of her district. She's the story's centerpiece and casting the role is crucial. The pressure is still on and fans will undoubtedly be keeping a close eye on the process. I know I will.
CATEGORIES Movies, Cinematical