Will Ferrell, known mostly as a funnyman, plays an uncharacteristically dark role in 'Everything Must Go' – an alcoholic who, in the same day, loses his wife and job. His belongings are thrown out on the front lawn, where he is forced to live illegally and much to the annoyance of his neighbors. Ferrell's character isn't entirely sympathetic, but he embarks on a bumpy journey of self-discovery that calls on his courage.

Ferrell unveiled the film at the Toronto International Film Festival, where Moviefone caught up with him.
Will Ferrell, known mostly as a funnyman, plays an uncharacteristically dark role in 'Everything Must Go' – an alcoholic who, in the same day, loses his wife and job. His belongings are thrown out on the front lawn, where he is forced to live illegally and much to the annoyance of his neighbors. Ferrell's character isn't entirely sympathetic, but he embarks on a bumpy journey of self-discovery that calls on his courage.

Ferrell unveiled the film at the Toronto International Film Festival, where Moviefone caught up with him.

How did you end up choosing this unusual part?
Dan Rush (the director/writer) and I had a great meeting. I thought it was one of the most original scripts I had ever come across, and I liked the challenge of doing something this serious. So I said to Dan that I'd love to do this, but you have to wait a year and a half, I really have that many things lined up. And he did! So that's actually how it happened. We were very frank with him. We said, "Understand that we think that this is so great, and we understand if you don't want to wait for us, because there must be many other actors that are clamoring to do this." But he did. He wanted to wait for me.

You ride a really fine line between funny and sad in this film. Are they connected?

Yeah, I guess they are. I've always thought that they are two steps away from each other at any moment. Last night [at the screening] I was actually surprised at how many laughs we did get -- that was really interesting to see. This audience was getting a lot more of the subtlety. But that wasn't really on our minds in any way; we never talked about having a certain part of the film be the funny part. It'll just happen, and if it does, it'll just be little moments that are organic to the story. That was another thing I loved about doing this film: there was never any pressure to force anything.

How did your character see himself at the beginning of the movie compared to the end?
We don't really know how he views himself at the beginning of the film. He's just going through his life, and I assume that as time goes on he's just going along making decisions because that's how he feels he should live his life, like keeping up with the Joneses or whatever. Whether it's work, or his personal possessions. And in this cataclysmic series of events that happens at the beginning of the movie he's forced to sit there and be with himself and really decide what he wants and what really is valuable to him. So I think by the end, he is going to go on, and there's hope for him.

'Everything Must Go' does not yet have a release date.