As always, the Toronto International Film Festival is showcasing a healthy dose of homegrown flicks during the glitzy international fest. Some have already become water cooler fodder. As in – weird, did you hear about that hockey musical?! Or, omigod, there's another 'FUBAR'! Let's give'r, eh?! (Is it wrong that I have a secret crush on Terry? I can't get enough of his flannel shirts and baggy sweats!)

'Score', the aforementioned hockey musical, has netted the coveted Opening Night Gala spot, which means TIFF has resumed its tradition of opening the fest with a Canadian movie after deviating last year with the British 'Creation.' Perhaps TIFF selected 'Score' -- about the most Canadian topic of all, hockey -- to make amends for last year's unpatriotic move. (That's right, TIFF – if you're not with us, you're against us! Glad to see you're back on board, and no longer succumbing to the temptation of Paul Bettany's glistening white, white complexion).

While 'Score' and 'FUBAR II' are rightly generating tons of buzz, there are other promising Canadian flicks quietly collecting accolades. Here's a rundown of homegrown fare you won't want to miss:
As always, the Toronto International Film Festival is showcasing a healthy dose of homegrown flicks during the glitzy international fest. Some have already become water cooler fodder. As in – weird, did you hear about that hockey musical?! Or, omigod, there's another 'FUBAR'! Let's give'r, eh?! (Is it wrong that I have a secret crush on Terry? I can't get enough of his flannel shirts and baggy sweats!)

'Score', the aforementioned hockey musical, has netted the coveted Opening Night Gala spot, which means TIFF has resumed its tradition of opening the fest with a Canadian movie after deviating last year with the British 'Creation.' Perhaps TIFF selected 'Score' -- about the most Canadian topic of all, hockey -- to make amends for last year's unpatriotic move. (That's right, TIFF – if you're not with us, you're against us! Glad to see you're back on board, and no longer succumbing to the temptation of Paul Bettany's glistening white, white complexion).

While 'Score' and 'FUBAR II' are rightly generating tons of buzz, there are other promising Canadian flicks quietly collecting accolades. Here's a rundown of homegrown fare you won't want to miss:

'Score: A Hockey Musical'
That's right. A hockey musical. It seems so wrong. A figure skating musical, sure. I can understand that. But hockey? That's a head-scratcher. That said, the early buzz has been overwhelmingly positive, so it sounds like 'Score' just might pull it off. Besides, it's in the very capable hands of Canadian director Michael McGowan ('One Week'). The movie appears to have it all, including young love, on-ice fights and cameos by Olivia Newton-John and Nelly Furtado. (Random!)

'The Whistleblower'
This political thriller by Canadian filmmaker Larysa Kondracki has been quietly garnering buzz. It tells the story of a peacekeeper working in Bosnia (played by Rachel Weisz) who discovers a sex-trafficking underworld in Bosnia that has unsettling ties to the UN. As she tries to expose the scandal, the UN does everything in its power to keep her quiet.

'FUBAR II'
Ready to shotgun some Pilsners? Everyone's favourite hosers, Deaner and Terry, are back. This time around, they're not wreaking havoc on the streets of Calgary. They're heading north after Tron lands them some lucrative jobs on the oil patch. If you can't catch this much-anticipated sequel at TIFF, you don't have to wait long – it hits theatres across the country on October 1.

'Daydream Nation'
On a much lighter note, this coming-of-age flick revolves around 17-year-old Caroline (Kat Dennings), who struggles to fit into the small town her family recently moved to. She winds up getting hot for teacher (Josh Lucas), and a bizarre love triangle ensues. This is the directorial debut for Canadian Mike Goldbach. As for Dennings -- she may be from Philly, but she should really get honourary Canadian status now, with her starring roles in Canadian movies like 'Daydream Nation' and 'Defendor.' And let's not forget she co-starred with Canada's hottest young export, Michael Cera, in 'Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist.'

'Barney's Version'
This film has been generating publicity since its very early days of production, when Summit Entertainment unceremoniously dumped 'Twilight' actress Rachelle Lefevre when she asked for some schedule changes so she could do both 'Barney's Version' and 'Eclipse' (Summit replaced her with Bryce Dallas Howard). Was it worth it? Probably. Instead of K-Stew and R-Patz, Lefevre gets to share the screen with the likes of Dustin Hoffman, Paul Giamatti, Rosamund Pike and Minnie Driver in this adaptation of the classic Mordecai Richler novel.