Are you exhausted by all the big-budget blockbusters and sequels that came out this summer? Well, you're in luck, because, beginning Thursday, the studios will roll out a number of their their top Oscar contenders at the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival.

This year's lineup includes some of the most talked about films of the year, including entries from Mike Leigh, Clint Eastwood, Danny Boyle and Woody Allen, as well as 'Black Swan,' the film that has propelled star Natalie Portman to the front of the Best Actress race.

But which films are we really anticipating? Check out our top 10 list after the jump.

Are you exhausted by all the big-budget blockbusters and sequels that came out this summer? Well, you're in luck, because, beginning Thursday, the studios will roll out a number of their their top Oscar contenders at the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival.

This year's lineup includes some of the most talked about films of the year, including entries from Mike Leigh, Clint Eastwood, Danny Boyle and Woody Allen, as well as 'Black Swan,' the film that has propelled star Natalie Portman to the front of the Best Actress race.

But which films are we really anticipating? Check out our top 10 list below.


Another Year'Another Year'
Mike Leigh's 'Another Year,' a quiet look at the life of a lonely suburban couple (Jim Broadbent and Ruth Sheen) and their friends, was a hit at Cannes, earning especially high praise for supporting player and Leigh veteran Lesley Manville, who plays the couple's boozing friend, Mary. With additional appearances by Imelda Staunton ('Vera Drake'), Oliver Maltman ('Happy-Go-Lucky') and Peter Wight ('Vera Drake'), 'Another Year' should appeal to die-hard fans of Leigh's filmography.



Biutiful'Biutiful'
Javier Bardem is already receiving advance praise for his performance in Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's 'Biutifiul,' in which he plays a man with a lot on his plate: In between raising two children on his own and managing illegal trades in the Barcelona underworld, he finds out that he has terminal cancer and only a handful of weeks to live. Depressing? Sure. Worth seeing? After 'Babel' and '21 Grams,' probably.



Blue Valentine'Blue Valentine'
This somber indie film from director Derek Cianfrance tracks the rise and subsequent fall of a relationship over the course of five years. The real selling point is said to be the lead performances by Oscar nominees Ryan Gosling ('Half Nelson') and Michelle Williams ('Brokeback Mountain'), who earned solid reviews when the film premiered at Sundance in January.


Black Swan'Black Swan'
One of the most talked about and anticipated movies of the year, 'Black Swan,' about two rival ballerinas (Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis), caused a frenzy the day its trailer hit the Internet, then again when it opened the 2010 Vencie Film Festival. Not that we're surprised. When critics are calling it 'The Red Shoes' on acid, how could you not want to see it?



Hereafter'Hereafter'
He's battled cowboys in the Old West and told people to get off his lawn, and now, Oscar-winner Clint Eastwood is set to tackle the supernatural in his new thriller 'Hereafter,' about the interconnecting lives of three people around the globe. Re-teaming with Eastwood is 'Invictus' co-star Matt Damon, who plays a San Francisco-based psychic who wants nothing to do with his powers. Bryce Dallas Howard co-stars as Damon's girlfriend.


The King's Speech'The King's Speech'
Colin Firth is riding high on Oscar buzz after 'The King's Speech' screened to rave reviews at the Telluride Film Festival last weekend. The film, which follows the true story of King George VI's (Firth) attempt to overcome his stutter as he assumed the throne of England, is tailor-made for the Oscars (Personal struggle? Check! British period piece? Yep. Geoffrey Rush? Uh-huh) and could do what 'The Queen' did for Helen Mirren in 2006.


Rabbit Hole'Rabbit Hole'
Nicole Kidman's career has stalled a bit since winning an Oscar for 'The Hours' in 2003, thanks to roles in such box office bombs as 'The Stepford Wives,' 'Bewitched' and 'The Golden Compass.' But all that could change with the premiere of 'Rabbit Hole,' a dark family drama from 'Hedwig and the Angry Inch' director John Cameron Mitchell, about a happily married couple (Kidman, Aaron Eckhart) whose son dies in a car accident. Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by David Lindsay-Abaire, from which he adapted, the film co-stars two-time Oscar winner Dianne Wiest as Kidman's mother.



The Town'The Town'
'The Town' marks Ben Affleck's second time behind the camera, following his highly acclaimed directorial debut ('Gone Baby Gone') in 2007. Based on the novel 'Prince of Thieves' by Chuck Hogan, the film puts Affleck back on the streets of Boston -- this time, as a bank robber who falls for a hostage ('Vicky Cristina Barcelona' star Rebecca Hall). The film boasts a prestige ensemble, with co-stars ranging from 'The Hurt Locker's' Jeremy Renner to 'Gossip Girl' beauty Blake Lively, and could add more fuel to this former 'Gigli' star's unexpected comeback.



You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger'You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger'
In 'You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger,' Woody Allen returns to London to tell the story of a group of couples whose passions for other people lead them into trouble. Advance word from Cannes was tepid at best, but given his long and illustrious career in Hollywood, it's hard not to anticipate a Woody Allen movie, especially when it includes performances by Naomi Watts, Antonio Banderas, Josh Brolin and Anthony Hopkins.



127 Hours'127 Hours'
Another film that received raves at Telluride, '127 Hours' marks Danny Boyle's highly anticipated follow-up to 'Slumdog Millionaire,' which won an astounding eight Oscars in 2009, including Best Picture. This time, Boyle teams with man-of-the-hour James Franco in this retelling of Aron Ralston's horrific true story, in which he spent 127 hours trapped by a boulder while mountain climbing in Utah. The film heads to Toronto with serious Oscar potential, and is reportedly so intense that paramedics were called to the scene at two recent screenings. (Though, when you cast someone as good-looking as Franco in the lead, that's bound to happen.)


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