indieWire is proud to welcome to its newest film blogger: legendary director Peter Bogdanovich. Bogdanovich's new column -- the appropriately titled "Blogdanovich" -- will profile classic films from Hollywood's Golden Age of cinema. On his first day, the director has already shone a spotlight on 'Ball of Fire,' 'Meet Me In St. Louis,' 'Love Affair' and John Cassavettes' legendary 'A Women Under the Influence.'

Bogdanovich broke out with 1971's 'The Last Picture Show.' After winning two Academy Awards -- and garnering six other nominations -- the film was preserved in the National Film Registry, in 1998. Since then, his filmography has included such popular works as 'What's Up, Doc?,' 'Paper Moon' and 'Mask.' indieWire is proud to welcome to its newest film blogger: legendary director Peter Bogdanovich. Bogdanovich's new column -- the appropriately titled "Blogdanovich" -- will profile classic films from Hollywood's Golden Age of cinema. On his first day, the director has already shone a spotlight on 'Ball of Fire,' 'Meet Me In St. Louis,' 'Love Affair' and John Cassavettes' legendary 'A Women Under the Influence.'

Bogdanovich broke out with 1971's 'The Last Picture Show.' After winning two Academy Awards -- and garnering six other nominations -- the film was preserved in the National Film Registry, in 1998. Since then, his filmography has included such popular works as 'What's Up, Doc?,' 'Paper Moon' and 'Mask.'

In addition to belonging to the 1970s wave of "New Hollywood" directors, Bogdanovich is a noted film historian, having authored many books on directors ranging from Orson Welles to Alfred Hitchcock. And if you still weren't sure how legitimate Bodganovich's credentials were, as he explains in his first column: "Since many of the pioneers in the medium were still around when I first came to Hollywood, I decided to put myself through their university, and interviewed extensively, or got to know, numerous filmmakers of the Golden Age just as it came to an end."

The goal of Blogdanovich is, in the director's words: "The state of movie culture -- indeed, the state of culture in the U.S.A. -- is at a distressingly low level. At film schools all over the country, most of the students act as though picture history begins somewhere around 'Raging Bull' ... I picked up at an early age that if you want to be of some quality in your chosen field, you had better have a damn good idea of all the superb or transcendent work that has been done before your advent. Not for the purpose of remakes, but in order to learn the vocabulary, grammar, the humanity, the art of the craft."

For all those who aspire to become filmmakers or even just noted cinephiles, 'Blogdanovich' is sure to become required reading.

CATEGORIES 'Fone Finds