The SwitchEarlier this year, we had Jennifer Lopez in The Back-Up Plan meeting her dream man the day she was artificially inseminated. Coming up in excellent US indie flick, The Kids Are Alright, Annette Bening and Julianne Moore play lesbian mothers who bore children thanks to a donation, it's revealed, from Mark Ruffalo. There must be something in the air, as The Switch, originally titled The Baster, occupies similar terrain.

New Yorker Kassie (Jennifer Aniston) is platonic best friends with nerdy Wally (Jason Bateman). But when she decides on single motherhood, she looks to tall, handsome stranger Roland (Patrick Wilson) for some DNA. At a somewhat-implausible "insemination party", Wally drunkenly spills the sample, replaces it with his own, and wakes up recalling nothing. A new job sees Kassie move away, but when she returns to NYC seven years later with young Sebastian in tow, Wally begins to realise what occurred that fateful night.

Find out what we thought of the film after the jump...
The SwitchThe Switch (12A)

Starring: Jennifer Aniston, Jason Bateman, Patrick Wilson, Jeff Goldblum
Directors: Josh Gordon, Will Speck
Running time: 102 minutes
Trailer: Watch it here

The plot: Earlier this year, we had Jennifer Lopez in The Back-Up Plan meeting her dream man the day she was artificially inseminated. Coming up in excellent US indie flick, The Kids Are Alright, Annette Bening and Julianne Moore play lesbian mothers who bore children thanks to a donation, it's revealed, from Mark Ruffalo. There must be something in the air, as The Switch, originally titled The Baster, occupies similar terrain. New Yorker Kassie (Jennifer Aniston) is platonic best friends with nerdy Wally (Jason Bateman). But when she decides on single motherhood, she looks to tall, handsome stranger Roland (Patrick Wilson) for some DNA. At a somewhat-implausible "insemination party", Wally drunkenly spills the sample, replaces it with his own, and wakes up recalling nothing. A new job sees Kassie move away, but when she returns to NYC seven years later with young Sebastian in tow, Wally begins to realise what occurred that fateful night.

What's good about it?
Aniston has had plenty of experience in this genre, but you wouldn't necessarily pick Bateman as a romantic leading man – and that interesting casting choice works in The Switch's favour. He rises to the challenge when Wally's called on to face up to his true feelings for his friend, and you buy why this man took so long to get there. Most affecting of all is the tender bond between Wally and the adorable Sebastian, who has sweetly inherited all his dad's OCD tendencies, and who recoils from the misguided efforts from a back-on-the-scene Roland to normalise him.

What's not so good? Like many romantic comedies, The Switch boasts a sky-high-concept premise that's a bit if a stretch. Really, who ever has an insemination party? Who jerks off to a picture of Diane Sawyer on the cover of New York magazine to replace a spilled sperm sample, and then forgets all about it? Nobody could be that drunk, least of all Wally.

Verdict: Aniston has already delivered one romcom this year, the glossy but forgettable Bounty Hunter, with Gerard Butler. This one is more-modestly budgeted, but warmer, more human and – most importantly of all – more enjoyable.

Rating: 7 out of 10

CATEGORIES Reviews