In the pantheon of great basketball movies, 'Teen Wolf' is often overlooked. And that's a shame. After all, it has every bit as much dramatic tension as 'Hoosiers' or 'White Men Can't Jump' -- but it also has a werewolf.

Do 'Hoosiers' and 'White Men Can't Jump' have werewolves? No, they do not. 'Teen Wolf' > 'Hoosiers' and 'White Men Can't Jump.'

Michael J. Fox, of course, has deservedly received nostalgic praise for having brought his boyish charms to the winsome 1985 film about a hirsute young man dreaming of basketball glory. But the movie features another performer whose efforts have previously gone unheralded -- and no, we're not talking about the guy who played Chubby.

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of 'Teen Wolf,' let's finally meet the Wolf himself: Jeff Glosser.

These days, Glosser is an assistant principal at an Arizona prep school, but back in 1985, as a freshman at Loyola Marymount University, he was offered the opportunity to be a part of what, a quarter century later, still holds up as one of the finer basketball films ever made, werewolves or no. Moviefone tracked Glosser down in the middle of a workday and persuaded him to tell us about the lone credit on his IMDB page. In the pantheon of great basketball movies, 'Teen Wolf' is often overlooked. And that's a shame. After all, it has every bit as much dramatic tension as 'Hoosiers' or 'White Men Can't Jump' -- but it also has a werewolf.

Do 'Hoosiers' and 'White Men Can't Jump' have werewolves? No, they do not. 'Teen Wolf' > 'Hoosiers' and 'White Men Can't Jump.'

Michael J. Fox, of course, has deservedly received nostalgic praise for having brought his boyish charms to the winsome 1985 film about a hirsute young man dreaming of basketball glory. But the movie features another performer whose efforts have previously gone unheralded -- and no, we're not talking about the guy who played Chubby.

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of 'Teen Wolf,' let's finally meet the Wolf himself: Jeff Glosser.

These days, Glosser is an assistant principal at an Arizona prep school, but back in 1985, as a freshman at Loyola Marymount University, he was offered the opportunity to be a part of what, a quarter century later, still holds up as one of the finer basketball films ever made, werewolves or no. Moviefone tracked Glosser down in the middle of a workday and persuaded him to tell us about the lone credit on his IMDB page.

Getting the job

Glosser's not shy about admitting that he wasn't the first choice to play the Wolf. "A week before the movie started filming, the basketball double dropped out," he explains. "I was a sophomore at Loyola Marymount University at the time, and Dick Baker, who played the referee in the movie, knew the basketball coach at the school. He asked him if he knew anyone who was small and could play basketball. I was involved in the sports program there, and I got a call from the athletic office -- 'Some guy wants to see if you want to be in a movie.' We shot around a bit, Michael J. Fox showed up, and we all got along great."

"Wolf! Wolf! Wolf!"
Playing basketball while decked out in the full wolf outfit was a little bit of a challenge, especially for a first-time actor. "We got there at five in the morning, and did makeup until eight," Glosser remembers. "Then we'd film from eight to eight." It wasn't playing in the wolf garb that was hard, he says -- just that he couldn't eat anything while wolfed out.

"For those twelve hours, you could just sip milkshakes, or soup," he recalls. "And it would get hot, too. The first night of shooting, I came down with a rebound, turned, and caught a guy's elbow -- and the whole mask just exploded off of my face because of sweat. Otherwise, the outfit wasn't so bad; it was really just a jumpsuit, and I still had control of my hands."


Hanging out with Michael J. Fox
Glosser's one regret, when he thinks back to the impact 'Teen Wolf' had on his life, is that he lost touch with Michael J. Fox somewhere along the way. "He was a great guy," he says. "For five or six years after the movie, I'd go see him a couple times a year on the set of 'Family Ties.' Then I moved out of L.A., and he moved back east, and I lost contact with him. But we got along well.

"Because I came in so late in the process, they initially spelled my name wrong in the credits -- but Michael J. Fox got me a credit in there, and did some nice things for me that he didn't have to do." Fox even offered to help Glosser get his screen extras card, so that he could do more movies, but he passed on it. "I'm a one-hit wonder," he laughs.

Lasting impact
Glosser was pretty surprised to hear from us -- these days, he doesn't get a whole lot of phone calls asking him about his role in 'Teen Wolf' 25 years ago. "It's been pretty funny," he says, "I work at a high school now, and I ended up becoming a basketball coach." He stresses that he didn't feel the need to mention his 'Teen Wolf' bona fides during the job interview, although that hasn't stopped students and colleagues from figuring it out. "There's a 'Teen Wolf' picture on my bulletin board that a couple of players brought in," he says. "Everywhere I go, when someone finds out, they'll bring it up."

So how does Glosser feel about his brief brush with cinematic and basketball immortality? In the end, he's pretty low-key about it. "For a low-budget film that came out of nowhere," Glosser opines, "we did pretty well to be remembered 25 years later."