Scott Pilgrim vs the World'Scott Pilgrim vs. The World,' the long-awaited film adaptation of the beloved cult graphic novel series, will transport you to the frozen land of Toronto where Scott Pilgrim must defeat new girlfriend Ramona Flowers' seven evil exes in the name of love. It will also challenge your knowledge of pop culture and video game history.

We caught 30 different video game references (some obvious, some obscure) and pop culture homages to everything from comic book superheroes to The Legend of Zelda to 'Seinfeld.' Did we miss any?

Keep reading for the list, but only if you've seen the film or don't mind having some plot points spoiled. Scott Pilgrim vs the World'Scott Pilgrim vs. The World,' the long-awaited film adaptation of the beloved cult graphic novel series, will transport you to the frozen land of Toronto where Scott Pilgrim must defeat new girlfriend Ramona Flowers' seven evil exes in the name of love. It will also challenge your knowledge of pop culture and video game history.

We caught 30 different video game references (some obvious, some obscure) and pop culture homages to everything from comic book superheroes to The Legend of Zelda to 'Seinfeld.' Did we miss any?

Keep reading for the list, but only if you've seen the film or don't mind having some plot points spoiled.


1. Scott's band is called Sex Bob-omb. A bob-omb is a wind-up walking bomb that made its debut in Super Mario Bros. 2. It's no friend, but thanks to its timed explosive nature it can be used as an impromptu weapon against other enemies.
2. When Scott defeats Ramona's evil exes, they dissolve into coins. One of the earliest and most memorable video games to use the coin phenomenon is River City Ransom on the NES, where enemies would also comically yell "Barf!" upon defeat. However recent games, like the over-the-top 'No More Heroes' series, combine coins with gore: chopping enemies in half results in a fountain of blood and cash.

3. Young Neil is Sex Bob-Omb's fill-in bassist, and also a Nintendo fanboy. He can be seen playing a Nintendo DS lite, wearing a Nintendo 64 t-shirt, and lists both Tetris and The Legend of Zelda as his favorite games.

4. Scott's roommate Wallace Wells can be a bit of a jerk. Then again, he's often stuck sharing his bed with Scott -- awkward, especially when he brings home a boyfriend. When first introduced, Wallace is given a rating of 7.5 out of 10. Many video game publications consider such a score "average." It's a roundabout way of saying he's not always the best roommate.

5. Scott's sister Stacey is rated in another way: "T for Teen." The ESRB was established in 1994 to rate games in an effort to better inform parents about a video game's content and basically keep stuff like Mortal Kombat out of kids' hands. According to the ESRBs official website, "T for Teen" reflects a game that contains "violence, suggestive themes, crude humor, minimal blood, simulated gambling, and/or infrequent use of strong language." Stacey falls under a couple of those categories.

6. Wallace refers to Scott's evil ex, Envy Adams, as "she who will not be named," a reference to Voldemort in the Harry Potter series.

7. Natalie Adams (aka Envy) is lead singer of the popular (by Canadian standards, anyway) band Clash at Demonhead. Gamers who grew up in gaming's heyday (the '80s) may recall the name. Clash at Demonhead was an action-platforming game whose most memorable feature was its awful box art.

8. When Scott relieves himself in one scene to escape social discomfort, a "pee bar" pops up in the corner of the bathroom and drains as Scott drains. The Sims games include various meters to measure your character's wants and needs, with bladder emptying chief among them. However, the general concept of a bar representing any number of things (from health to magic power) in a video game is timeless.

9. Music from The Legend of Zelda games is sprinkled throughout the film. You can hear it during a dream sequence and as background music in the opening scenes.

10. Scott woos Knives and tries to pick up Ramona with the trivia tidbit that Pac-Man was originally called Puck Man, but the name was changed when it was released in America because the ease with which vandals could change an innocent "P" into an offensive "F."

11. Scott and Ramona are able to travel on subspace highways by entering a door that appears to lead to nowhere. While the door to another universe is a common storytelling device now, the earliest reference we could find to it was from H.G. Wells' story 'The Door in the Wall.'

12. Scott Pilgrim's fight scenes owe plenty to the fighting game genre, particularly the Street Fighter series. Various flourishes appear during the movie's boss battles, such as a "vs" image during the start of the fight, a combo counter for when Scott wails endlessly on an evil ex, and "reversal," which indicates a counter attack.

13. Scott dream-travels to a desert world which seems to be a reference to 'Wayne's World 2's' referencing of Oliver Stone's 'The Doors' film.

14. Matthew Patel, the first evil ex Scott must defeat, is Indian. In addition to his Bollywood-style dance moves, Patel has mystical powers, including levitation and the ability to hurl fireballs. In these ways he's similar to Dhalsim -- the yoga enthusiast from the Street Fighter series.

15. Scott beats Matthew Patel with a 64-hit combo, which references the insane combat of the Marvel vs. Capcom series.

16. A booming voice says "KO" when Scott defeats an evil ex, much like nearly every fighting game ever released.

17. Scott's wardrobe is inspired by video games. One sports a design that looks suspiciously similar to Rock Band's bass logo, and another portrays a skull using the classic Space Invaders motif.

18. The signature 'Seinfeld' music plays as Scott enters his apartment to a scene set with a laugh track.

19. The Universal Studios music theme heard at the beginning owes its existence to chiptune music used in early video games.

20. During the fight with Evil Ex Number 2 Lucas Lee, Scott convinces him to show off his skateboarding moves. The subsequent sequence is highly reminiscent of the older Tony Hawk's Pro Skater games, which allowed players to grind down long stretches of rails, effortlessly jumping back and forth between them.

21. Did anyone else notice that Evil Ex Number 3's powers seem an awful lot like the X-Men's Havok?

22. In a twist on the film's formula, Ramona scuffles with her only ex-girlfriend, Roxie Richter, in a "hasbian" vs. lesbian throwdown. Ramona whips out a giant hammer like the one Mario uses in the original Donkey Kong arcade game, while Roxie's weapon is a whip-sword similar to the one Ivy Valentine uses in the fighting game series Soulcalibur.

23. Roxie uses a teleportation power that creates a cloud of smoke very similar to Night Crawler's power.

24. At certain points in the movie, Scott "levels up" -- gaining new power and strength. On-screen text describes which aspects were powered up. This has been a staple of role-playing games since the original Final Fantasy, where characters "leveled up" after acquiring a set amount of experience points from defeating monsters in random battles.

25. Scott gets a 1-up (an extra life) that looks like him, which is standard video game 1-up procedure.

26. The leader of the evil exes, Gideon Gordon Graves, is wearing a t-shirt that transforms the three Gs of his name into three triangles, placed within the three corners of a bigger triangle. It resembles the completed Triforce from "The Legend of Zelda." Each individual Triforce contains a unique power: courage, power, and wisdom. GGG is not humble if he's wearing a t-shirt that has all three combined.

27. Scott teams up with another character during one particularly grueling boss battle. The phrase "2 Player Mode" pops up during this phase of the fight, alluding to the ability for gamers to play cooperatively in certain games. In this case, the term "drop in, drop out co-op" may be more appropriate.

28. Appropriately, the final boss has a massive life bar that drains as he's hurt. Anyone who has played classic action games like Castlevania or Ninja Gaiden should be familiar with this health display. Luckily, he doesn't have multiple, differently colored life bars stacked on top of each other like some bosses from the Devil May Cry games.

29. When Scott and other characters are hit by an attack or are close to death, they pulse red. Link from The Legend of Zelda would prefer his royalty payment in rupees.
30. The concept of a hero fighting his or her doppelganger is old hat for video games. Castlevania heroes have had to do it, as have Link, Samus Aran (Metroid Prime), and Ryu (Ninja Gaiden), to name a few. Scott eventually must face his own evil twin, though the battle ends a bit unexpectedly.

Did you find more video game and pop culture references in 'Scott Pilgrim'? Let us know in the comments.