"Radioactive wild boars are on the rise in Germany, where they have attacked and frightened residents, even snarling traffic when they gang up on roadways..."


The above sounds like it should be read off of the back of a VHS box from the '80s, no? It's actually from this article on the Discovery Channel's website, which outlines how Germany came to be plagued by a growing population of wild, irradiated boar.

It all stems back to the famous meltdown of Ukraine's Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 1986. The brunt of that explosion was felt in and around Pripyat, the town nearest Chernobyl, but radiation from the event spread throughout Europe and the effects of it are still being felt years later. Traces of the fallout can be found in a number of different species, but apparently in Germany it is particularly problematic for their populations of wild boar because their diets mainly consist of mushrooms and truffles, which are basically miniature vaults of radiation absorbed from the soil.

As far as I can tell these radioactive boars aren't horribly mutated (or maybe that's a cover-up!), so they're not any more dangerous to humans than their non-nuclear counterparts. But because of abnormally warm winters and larger fields of corn being farmed, the radioactive bastards are multiplying at an alarming rate (over twice as many were shot in '08/'09 than in prior hunting seasons). I certainly don't want to wish death-by-killer-mutant-boar on Germany, but I'd by lying if I pretended like part of me isn't waiting to see more headlines about Germans clashing with an uncontrollable population of freaking radioactive boar.

[Note the above image is not one of Germany's legion of nuclear pigs, it's just Pigzilla. Yep, swine can get that big without the aid of a nuclear disaster. Your move, Syfy channel.]