As Christopher Campbell noted in his nightly news roundup, Fox has bought the rights to the book 29: A Novel, by Adena Halpern. I haven't read the book itself, but the book's premise of a 75-year-old who would like to be 29 once again is certainly relatable, if only to remember that, hey, being that age wasn't really all it was cracked up to be. (Why 29 was the age our protagonist Ellie Jerome chose to return to is beyond me. God, that year sucked.)

If they stick to the book, the movie will be powered by a predominantly female cast that spans the generations. There's Ellie, of course, as well as her granddaughter Lucy, her daughter Barbara, and Ellie's BFF Frida. That's pretty cool, in my opinion, even though I suspect the majority of the movie will follow Lucy and Ellie's adventures as 29-year-olds and not so much on Frida's search for her friend, who she thinks has been kidnapped. Either way, yay for more movies with lots of women front and center, based on a book by a woman! Then again, the only person attached to the project is producer John Davis, who also produced Marmaduke and Predators, so perhaps my hope is misplaced.

However, what really caught my attention is that Fox "is hoping to turn the book into 'an event movie for women,'" according to The Hollywood Reporter. What, exactly, is an event movie for women?



Sex and the City 2 was counting on its female fanbase to make it a great big party -- high heels, lip gloss, cosmos beforehand with your best girlfriends, etc. -- but even that sputtered out sooner than expected.

What's the tie-in here to make it an event? Why does there even have to be an event in the first place to give the movie legs? At best, this sounds like a cute movie to catch with your mom on a Sunday afternoon. It seems asinine, even condescending, to think that there has to be an event to lure a women to a movie. Studio people claim that female audiences are notoriously "fickle," but maybe that's because we're treated like kids. It also makes me think that Fox doesn't have much faith in the final product, no matter how good or popular the book is.