CATEGORIES Features
Bill Murray at Tribeca Film FestivalThere are not many comic actors as beloved as Bill Murray, and for very good reason.

Since his mainstream debut as a 'Saturday Night Live' regular in 1977, his offbeat, goofball persona has mellowed into a deadpan, bone-dry humor that's equally, if not more, hilarious. His acting chops have also sharpened with age; some of his film performances have been downright poignant ('Broken Flowers'). For longtime fans, there is no one cooler or funnier. Murray is (still) The Man.

The latest incarnation of his comic and dramatic talents is undertaker Frank Quinn in the dramedy 'Get Low,' co-starring Robert Duvall and Sissy Spacek, opening Friday. (The always-game Murray recently injured his head in a David Letterman dumpster pool-diving stunt and though he soldiered through the subsequent interview, he had to skip a screening of the film that night.)

In celebration of his latest movie -- and the 30th anniversary of 'Caddyshack' -- we bring you some of our favorite Murray movie moments (at least of the clips that are available), a near impossible feat with so much greatness to choose from, we soon realized. Which didn't stop us. Bill Murray at Tribeca Film FestivalThere are not many comic actors as beloved as Bill Murray, and for very good reason.

Since his mainstream debut as a 'Saturday Night Live' regular in 1977, his offbeat, goofball persona has mellowed into a deadpan, bone-dry humor that's equally, if not more, hilarious. His acting chops have also sharpened with age; some of his film performances have been downright poignant ('Broken Flowers'). For longtime fans, there is no one cooler or funnier. Murray is (still) The Man.

The latest incarnation of his comic and dramatic talents is undertaker Frank Quinn in the dramedy 'Get Low,' co-starring Robert Duvall and Sissy Spacek, opening Friday. (The always-game Murray recently injured his head in a David Letterman dumpster pool-diving stunt and though he soldiered through the subsequent interview, he had to skip a screening of the film that night.)

In celebration of his latest movie -- and the 30th anniversary of 'Caddyshack' -- we bring you some of our favorite Murray movie moments (at least of the clips that are available), a near impossible feat with so much greatness to choose from, we soon realized. Which didn't stop us.

"It just doesn't matter!" from 'Meatballs' (1979)

As goofy but good-hearted head counselor Tripper Harrison, Murray makes summer more than tolerable for even the lowliest campers at the low-rent Camp Northstar. In this clip, he maniacally exhorts his charges to compete with elite Camp Mohawk in the annual Olympiad. The film marked Murray's first credited movie appearance and initial collab with director Ivan Reitman, with whom he'd re-team for 'Stripes' and 'Ghostbusters.'


Caddying for the Dalai Lama from 'Caddyshack' (1980)
As psychotic, gopher-obsessed country club groundskeeper Carl Spackler, Murray had (and took) plenty of opportunities to steal the Harold Ramis-directed golf comedy from Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield and Ted Knight. Here he tells of the time he caddied for the Dalai Lama in Tibet and received more than the usual tip. (In real life Murray is an avid golfer who's played in many celebrity tournaments.)


"We're mutants" from 'Stripes' (1981)
In this hit military comedy, which was made with the full cooperation of the U.S. Army (!), Murray plays all-around loser John Winger, who enlists, along with his equally hapless pal Russell (Harold Ramis), in order to get in shape and dry out. In this clip, Winger convinces his platoon of misfits -- including a wonderful John Candy -- that they have what it takes to execute a drill display, in a parodic yet rousing battle speech. (The resulting, highly unorthodox drill is another great scene).


Zuul seduction scene from 'Ghostbusters' (1984)
In this mega-successful comedy, Murray -- as paranormal scientist Peter Venkman -- finds himself very attracted to his ghostbusting team's latest client (Sigourney Weaver), who has become possessed by an ancient demonic entity. Here Venkman shows up at his date's apartment and keeps his cool despite her alarming (and very sexy) transformation. "I guess the roses worked, huh?"


"I'm sailing!" from 'What About Bob?' (1991)
There are many hilarious moments in this Frank Oz-directed comedy about a needy, neurotic New Yorker (Murray) who relentlessly stalks his psychiatrist (Richard Dreyfuss), but this scene in which Bob experiences yet another "breakthrough" by going sailing with the doctor's daughter (Kathryn Erbe), is a classic.


"I am really close on this one" from 'Groundhog Day' (1993)
This Ramis-directed existential romance-comedy-fantasy is satisfying on so many levels, not least of which is (naturally) Murray's portrayal of self-centered TV weatherman Phil, who finds himself reliving the same day in Punxsutawney, Pa., over and over again. This clip shows Phil trying to be "normal" as he woos his producer (Andie MacDowell), with whom he's falling in love.


Photo shoot from 'Lost in Translation' (2003)
When Sofia Coppola wrote the script for this movie (which she also directed), she had only one person in mind for Bob Harris, a once-successful American actor who's in Japan to shoot a lucrative commercial for Suntory Whiskey. Good thing Murray finally agreed to star along with Scarlett Johansson in this dreamy, evocative film about friendship and alienation. Here Bob bemusedly tries to interpret directions from the ad's photographer.


Steve kicks pirate butt in 'The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou' (2004)
In this typically whimsical film from directer Wes Anderson, Murray (who's appeared in every Anderson feature since 'Rushmore') plays an eccentric oceanographer seeking revenge on a shark that ate one of his team. The whole movie's a fabulous hoot, but this scene, in which Steve Z. single-handedly takes on a boatload of pirates (to the music of The Stooges' 'Search and Destroy'), is especially satisfying. "Don't point that gun at him; he's an unpaid intern."


Murray as Murray in 'Zombieland' (2009)
One of the best and funniest cameos in recent film was Murray playing himself in last year's 'Zombieland.' Here, urged on by Woody Harrelson's and Emma Stone's characters, he plays a joke by pretending to be a real zombie. (It backfires.) We totally relate to Stone's character, who can't help but crack up despite the tragic result.


"Bartending with a Ghostbuster" in Austin (2010)

OK, this clip isn't from a movie, but it encapsulates many of the things we love about Murray: he's game, he's spontaneous, he's fun. Here, a bartender at Austin's Shangri-La tells us how he found himself working next to the actor during 2010's SXSW festival, when Murray suddenly decided to help out. Sure, he gave people tequila shots no matter what they ordered, but still ... We only wish we'd been there.