Catfish
is a hard film to write about because the entire movie hinges upon a ton of reveals that take place during the final third of the film, and talking about them publicly beforehand would simply ruin the experience of watching it for the first time with no knowledge of what will happen next. When Catfish first premiered at this past Sundance Film Festival, it took the festival by storm, as critics danced around the details in an effort to tell everyone how good the documentary was without actually telling anyone what the documentary was about. And now the film's first trailer (watch it over at Apple) attempts to do the same thing, but one question remains: Will they be able to keep up this "don't say a word" game long enough to use it to actually sell the movie?

From my Sundance review: "... here's what I can tell you: Yaniv "Nev" Schulman is a young up-and-coming New York photographer who, at one point, had one of his photos published in The New York Sun. Not long after that, Nev received a painting of his photograph in the mail; one that was so expertly and beautifully crafted by an 8-year-old girl named Abby. Nev soon struck up a Facebook friendship with Abby, sending her his photographs in order to help feed this little girl with an amazing talent -- eventually becoming online and phone friends with Abby's family, including her mother Angela and older sister Megan, as well as several of Megan's friends from home in Michigan. Fascinated by this relationship and the art it was producing, Nev's filmmaker brother Ariel and friend Henry Joost decided to document the goings-on of this somewhat peculiar-yet-endearing friendship, but little did they know at the time it would turn into one of the most fascinating stories you'll watch all year."



I don't really want to say more than that until after the film comes out and we can all have a discussion about it. I will say this, though: Do yourself a favor and try to keep away from Catfish spoilers. It's a freaky doc that, as I said in my review, is "overwhelmingly sad, honest, creepy and ultimately hopeful," and it's best to watch it with fresh eyes.