CATEGORIES Movie News
As Inception continues to baffle and amaze audiences, and theories as to what the hell exactly was going on bound around the internet, it seems that the intrigue goes even further as Gawker have put up a video that seems to suggest even the music was playing with our minds.

In the film, the song 'Non, je ne regrette rien' is used by the crew of dashing sleep invaders as a way of warning themselves that the dream is about to end and a 'kick' is going to occur (if you haven't watched it I really can't explain more than that).

A lot of people have commented about this choice of music as it is, of course, the song which made a star out of its singer, Edith Piaf, who was played in the 2007 biopic of her life, La Vie En Rose, by Marion Cotilard, who also plays Mal in Inception. Although the song works brilliantly within the film, the link between the two has been described by some viewers as slightly distracting.

Well, the video which we have embedded after the jump throws some light on why they might have chosen the Edith Piaf track... As Inception continues to baffle and amaze audiences, and theories as to what the hell exactly was going on bound around the internet, it seems that the intrigue goes even further as Gawker have put up a video that seems to suggest even the music was playing with our minds.

In the film, the song 'Non, je ne regrette rien' is used by the crew of dashing sleep invaders as a way of warning themselves that the dream is about to end and a 'kick' is going to occur (if you haven't watched it I really can't explain more than that).

A lot of people have commented about this choice of music as it is, of course, the song which made a star out of its singer, Edith Piaf, who was played in the 2007 biopic of her life, La Vie En Rose, by Marion Cotilard, who also plays Mal in Inception. Although the song works brilliantly within the film, the link between the two has been described by some viewers as slightly distracting.

Well, the video which we have embedded below throws some light on why they might have chosen the Edith Piaf track. When slowed down it does seem to uncannily mimic the main theme from Hans Zimmer's Inception score. Is this a coincidence or more trickery? Do we now have to go back and watch the film again to see if the placing of the main theme is trying to tell us anything – perhaps its a subconscious 'kick' within itself.

Either way, I'm looking for any excuse to see it again and this might just be it...