Prince Charles wearing 3D glassesIt would seem that the great love affair with 3D films, which includes inflated ticket prices, possible nausea and inferior post-conversion picture quality, may soon be over.

According to The Wrap, 3D movies have been suffering a severe decline in their revenue for the past year and they've put together a chart which illustrates the percentage of a movie's total revenue which came from 3D screenings in the US.

The chart starts with Avatar which earned fully 71% of its revenue from 3D showings and then that percentage declines steadily. When it was released on 9 July, Despicable Me only made 45% from 3D.

Take a look at the chart and read more about the decline in 3D movie revenue after the jump... Prince Charles wearing 3D glassesIt would seem that the great love affair with 3D films, which includes inflated ticket prices, possible nausea and inferior post-conversion picture quality, may soon be over.

According to The Wrap, 3D movies have been suffering a severe decline in their revenue for the past year and they've put together a chart - which you can see below - which illustrates the percentage of a movie's total revenue which came from 3D screenings in the US.

The chart starts with Avatar which earned fully 71% of its revenue from 3D showings and then that percentage declines steadily. When it was released on 9 July, Despicable Me only made 45% from 3D.

Take a look at the chart:



However, The Wrap's data is somewhat skewed as it neglects to mention other 3D releases such as Clash of the Titans and doesn't take into account that Avatar doubtlessly had more pre-publicity than Despicable Me and that the latter film has only been out a few weeks.

Although 3D movies have been around for 70-odd years, its heyday was in the 50s and 60s when countless B-movies, mostly Westerns and Sci-Fi, were given the cardboard glasses treatment. Due to overexposure and the fact that the films weren't really very good, it died out until recently when technology caught up and a more satisfying visual experience could be delivered.

However, we seem to have reached that point again when, literally, every film has something to do with 3D - it's obvious that studios are more concerned with how to milk it rather than delivering a well-crafted film. If audiences continue to choose the normal two-dimensional option then we could soon be bidding farewell to our gimmicky old friend for another fifty years.

CATEGORIES Movies