CATEGORIES Movies
We hope that Rihanna will be at the top of her game for this one: According to Variety, the singer will make her feature film debut alongside Alexander Skarsgard and Taylor Kitsch in Universal's 'Battleship,' a live-action, big-budget actioner based on the Hasbro naval combat board game. The story revolves around a fleet of ships forced to do battle with an armada of unknown origins. Kitsch stars as a Naval officer who leads the fight and Skarsgard will play his brother. Director Peter Berg will begin shooting soon for a May 25, 2012, release date. We hope that Rihanna will be at the top of her game for this one: According to Variety, the singer will make her feature film debut alongside Alexander Skarsgard and Taylor Kitsch in Universal's 'Battleship,' a live-action, big-budget actioner based on the Hasbro naval combat board game. The story revolves around a fleet of ships forced to do battle with an armada of unknown origins. Kitsch stars as a Naval officer who leads the fight and Skarsgard will play his brother. Director Peter Berg will begin shooting soon for a May 25, 2012, release date.

Zac Efron sure is lucky. He's lined up seven-plus projects for the near future and now he's in negotiations to star in Warner Bros.' 'The Lucky One,' based on the Nicholas Sparks novel, published in 2008, about a Marine who survives three tours in Iraq and attributes his good fortune to a photograph he carried of a woman he has never met, according to Deadline Hollywood. When he returns to the states he sets out to meet her.


Oliver Stone is in hot water again. Not for his politics this time, but for anti-Semitic remarks he made to the Sunday Times in the UK, according to The Hollywood Reporter. When asked in a Sunday Times of London interview why there was "such a focus on the Holocaust," Stone replied: "The Jewish domination of the media." He added: "They stay on top of every comment, the most powerful lobby in Washington. Israel has f***** up United States foreign policy for years." The Anti-Defamation League on Monday harshly criticized Stone's comments, saying: "Oliver Stone has once again shown his conspiratorial colors with his comments about 'Jewish domination of the media' and control over U.S. foreign policy. His words conjure up some of the most stereotypical and conspiratorial notions of undue Jewish power and influence." Stone issued an apology Monday afternoon. "In trying to make a broader historical point about the range of atrocities the Germans committed against many people, I made a clumsy association about the Holocaust, for which I am sorry and I regret," Stone said in a statement.

Ripped from the headlines: A film about the unsolved disappearance of American teenager Natalee Holloway from the Dutch Caribbean island of Aruba in 2005 will be released early next year. Shot on Aruba between April and July this year, the film, titled 'Me & Mr. Jones,' centers on an undercover journalist who breaks into chief suspect Joran Van der Sloot's home on Aruba to force a breakthrough in the case. Emmy-nominated Robert de Hoog plays the role of the journalist, while Hanna Verboom plays a woman who assists him. Van der Sloot recently was arrested for the murder of Stephany Flores, 21, in a Lima, Peru hotel room, and is still linked to the Holloway disappearance. [THR]

Elisabeth Shue is taking up residence in the thriller 'House at the End of the Street,' about a teen girl who moves with her mom to a new town and learns that their home is across the street from a house where a double murder took place. Complications arise when she befriends the massacre's sole surviving son. Shue will star as the mother opposite Jennifer Lawrence (the teen girl) and Max Thieriot (the survivor). Mark Tonderai will direct. [THR]


Here's another classic kids picturebook being turned into a big screen, family comedy: 'Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,' written by Judith Viorst and published in 1972. Shawn Levy and 20th Century Fox are teaming on the project, though Levy hasn't committed to directing the feature. The book, which centers around a family enduring the worst day of their lives, was adapted into a half-hour, animated musical on HBO in 1990 and became a Kennedy Center musical production, with music and lyrics by Viorst, in 1998. [Variety]