Dreams and movies have gone hand and hand for as long as cinema has been around. Not only does a dream in a movie bring out comedy, horror, and sometimes unlock the key to something a character has been searching for, it also gives the director a chance to step outside of the box and create an alternate world for the characters to play in briefly.

Christopher Nolan takes that sentiment and expands it into one of the most elaborate dreamscapes ever put on film with 'Inception.' In the film, Leonardo DiCaprio plays Dom Cobb, a professional thief whose talents involve delving deep into a person's mind to extract valuable secrets while he or she is in a dream state.

So that got us thinking about our favorite dream sequences in movie history. From Hitchcock to Gondry, some of the most creative minds in the business have leaped into dreams to have a little fun. Here are 10 that we feel are in a class by themselves.

Dreams and movies have gone hand and hand for as long as cinema has been around. Not only does a dream in a movie bring out comedy, horror, and sometimes unlock the key to something a character has been searching for, it also gives the director a chance to step outside of the box and create an alternate world for the characters to play in briefly.

Christopher Nolan takes that sentiment and expands it into one of the most elaborate dreamscapes ever put on film with 'Inception.' In the film, Leonardo DiCaprio plays Dom Cobb, a professional thief whose talents involve delving deep into a person's mind to extract valuable secrets while he or she is in a dream state.

So that got us thinking about our favorite dream sequences in movie history. From Hitchcock to Gondry, some of the most creative minds in the business have leaped into dreams to have a little fun. Here are 10 that we feel are in a class by themselves.

'The Big Lebowski' (1998) - 'Gutterballs' Dream

All The Dude (Jeff Bridges) wanted was to get his rug back. Now he's face down on a porno king's living room after being slipped a mickey in his White Russian. What follows is the Coen Brothers' fantastic dream sequence, played over the Kenny Rogers and The First Edition song 'Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In).'



'Pee-wee's Big Adventure' (1985) – Bike Dream

Tim Burton knows a little something about dreams. He's been making his (however dark they may be) into movies for decades; and with 'Pee-wee's Big Adventure,' he takes his twisted humor and meshes it with inspirations from cinematic classics like 'The Bicycle Thief' and 'Wild Strawberries' to chronicle the journey of a boy searching for his bike. In this scene, Pee-wee (Paul Reubens) dreams about his beloved bike and some really scary clowns.



'Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back' (1980) – The Dark Side Cave

The best thing about sci-fi is you don't have to play by the rules. So on the planet of Dagobah, Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) doesn't have to sleep to dream -- he just walks into a creepy cave. Yoda tells Luke you will see what you take with you. This is what he takes in.



'Romy and Michele's High School Reunion' (1997) – Reunion Dream

Romy (Mira Sorvino) and Michele (Lisa Kudrow) have been spending weeks getting ready to attend their high school reunion. But when things don't turn out the way they plan (turns out someone else had invented Post-Its), the girls get into a fight, leading Michele to fall asleep in the car and enter this trippy dream sequence that takes her 70 years into the future.



'The Science of Sleep' (2006) – Work Dream

Ever since his music video-directing days, you could say Michel Gondry has had an affection for things outside of reality. But in 'The Science of Sleep,' that love is manifested as we follow a young man (Gael García Bernal) who's obsessed with his dreams (and often isn't sure if he's awake or not) as he deals with love, life and his crummy job.



'Vertigo' (1958) – Scottie's Nightmare

Perhaps it was because he had spent most of his career making films in black and white, but when Alfred Hitchcock began making them in color, he made sure to use the medium to its highest potential. This is most evident in the nightmare sequence in 'Vertigo.' After Scottie (James Stewart) has witnessed his love plunge to her death, he has a horrible nightmare filled with flashing colors, animation and a spiraling freefall (accompanied by a dizzying score by Bernard Herrmann). It's not the first time Hitchcock dabbles in dreams, but it's one of his most powerful.




'Fast Times at Ridgemont High' (1982) – Linda Barrett Interrupts


Daydreaming can be fun. But in the case of Brad Hamilton (Judge Reinhold), it turns into every guy's worst nightmare. Need we say more?

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'An American Werewolf in London' (1981) – Werewolf Nazis

With the mixture of John Landis' twisted humor and the talents of legendary makeup artist Rick Baker, 'An American Werewolf in London' changed the way we perceived horror. The film also was one of the first to do the dream-within-a-dream sequence, which for this scene makes it turn from funny-scary to just plain scary.

'Spellbound' (1945) – Dalí's Dreamscape

Before 'Vertigo,' Hitchcock's most memorable dream sequence came during 'Spellbound,' in which he called upon surrealist master Salvador Dalí to create a repressed dream experience filled with psychoanalytic symbols that "John Brown" (Gregory Peck) tells to his doctors in an attempt to unlock his memories.




'The Wizard of Oz' (1939) – Inside the Twister


One of the most famous dreams in movies, it begins for Dorothy (Judy Garland) running home with Toto as the tornado is about to hit her house. As the rest of her family files into the cellar, Dorothy is left in the house to fend for herself. Next stop, the yellow brick road ...