Nic CageRarely is a young person's first job as cool as being the apprentice to a sorcerer like in Disney's aptly named 'The Sorcerer's Apprentice.'

Reuters asked the film's producer Jerry Bruckheimer, director Jon Turteltaub and stars including Jay Baruchel, Nicolas Cage and Alfred Molina about their first jobs here.

Cage sold popcorn at a movie theater. Baruchel screamed like a little girl in an episode of Nickelodeon's 'Are You Afraid of the Dark?' Molina worked in a morgue (creepy!). Turteltaub apprenticed with TV legend Dick Clark. Bruckheimer was a mailroom employee at an ad agency.

Inspired by this, Moviefone asked its staff to tell us about their first jobs -- some awesome and some pretty awful. Check them out below. Nic CageRarely is a young person's first job as cool as being the apprentice to a sorcerer like in Disney's aptly named 'The Sorcerer's Apprentice.'

Reuters asked the film's producer Jerry Bruckheimer, director Jon Turteltaub and stars including Jay Baruchel, Nicolas Cage and Alfred Molina about their first jobs here.

Cage sold popcorn at a movie theater. Baruchel screamed like a little girl in an episode of Nickelodeon's 'Are You Afraid of the Dark?' Molina worked in a morgue (creepy!). Turteltaub apprenticed with TV legend Dick Clark. Bruckheimer was a mailroom employee at an ad agency.

Inspired by this, Moviefone asked its staff to tell us about their first jobs -- some awesome and some pretty awful. Check them out below.

Patricia Chui, Managing Editor: One summer home from college, I worked as a typist in the classified section of the local newspaper. All I did, all day, was type up super-short, super-cheesy listings for odd jobs and real estate ("He'll love the garage, she'll love the kitchen!"). Every once in a while, I covered the switchboard and accidentally hung up on about 30 percent of the callers. On my last day, my co-workers took me to Red Lobster. To this day, I can type like a maniac.

Fredy Perojo, Senior Photo Editor: One of my first photography jobs was to shoot the Santa portraits at the local mall. I was in college and needed to make some quick cash over the holidays.

Gabrielle Dunn, Editorial Assistant: My first job was in catering (not unlike in the TV show 'Party Down') at my synagogue. I was 14 and they had me as a cocktail waitress bringing drinks to all these middle-aged people at bar mitzvahs, trying to get drunk and forget they're at a kid's party. One time, we did a wedding and the groomsmen ordered shots; and when I brought them over, they said they'd ordered me one, too. I told them I was underage, but they chanted until I took it. It was not a working environment for tweens.

Elizabeth Brady, Assistant Programming Manager: My first job out of college was one I really used my degree for: bartender at a divey sports bar (my parents were so proud!). The place was horrible -- drunken fights with pool balls and sticks, cockroaches flying out of the register, people drinking white wine on the rocks and blasting Nickleback on the jukebox. I used to have to bring a broom into the storage room with me, to fend off the rats that lived there -- they were the size of raccoons. After working there for that one summer, I'll never be able to look at the service industry in NYC the same.

Elna Hubbell, Partner Relations Associate: I played Kathy Jo Elliott on 'Petticoat Junction.' I have a vague recollection of me and a chimp in a cage. Mom enjoyed most of the perks.

Lesley Kallet Rose, Partner Relations Director: I graduated a semester early from college, and didn't want to give in to my parents and move home early to save them rent money. So I sucked it up and got a job grading elementary education year end exams for the state of Michigan. It was mind numbing -- all I did all day long for 8 hours at a time was check "pass" or "fail" based on their strict list of criteria. The worst part of it was, I had to be there at 8AM every day ... torture for a college student! It paid well, though, so I was able to party on in Ann Arbor -- well, at least at night.

Chantal Thomas, Senior Programming Manager: 1-hour photo lab when I was 14. It was a great job sorting and developing some of the weirdest 35mm photos. Remember when taking photos still involved a roll of film?

Andrew Scott, News Editor: The summer before college, I got a job at a local movie theater, which was (sadly) my dream job at the time. And why wouldn't it be? I was promised free drinks, free popcorn and, more importantly, free movies. And I got all of those things, but with a heavy price: Friday-night crowds, unhappy customers, sticky floors -- all for the wonderful charge of $5.75 an hour. By the end of the summer, I grew fed up with everyone there and wrote a long letter to my manager, explaining that I needed to quit early so I could help my grandmother move to her new home in Nashville. In reality, I spent the rest of the summer watching new episodes of 'Passions' on my couch.

Alicia Roda, Associate Editor: My first job was at an ice cream parlor around the block from my house. It became a hangout spot for my group of friends (i'm sure the sweet discount had nothing to do with that). We were allotted a medium serving size of free ice cream each shift. Needless to stay, that rule was broken very often. Who can resist delicious Hershey's ice cream? Anyway, we gossiped, got cavities and had a great time.

Sandra Deane, Editorial Director, AOL Television: I worked as a costume wench for the New York Renaissance Faire for one hot, seemingly endless summer. The job required squeezing into a corset and boots daily, enduring 100-degree temperatures and speaking proper Elizabethan language ("Fare-thee-well, good sir!") while also repairing torn costumes, helping the actors get laced in and running props across the many-acre wood. At the end of the day, I would collect all the foul-smelling garb to be cleaned and start it all over again the next day. The pay was paltry, but the honey mead was free, the kinship was genuiune and it was an experience unlike any other.

Christopher Jancelewicz, Entertainment Editor: I was a carnie. An honest-to-goodness carnie. When I was 16, the CNE (Canadian National Exhibition) rolled through Toronto on its annual summer tour, and I ran several carnival games. I spent my days yelling at random fairgoers through a microphone, trying to goad them into playing the games. I spent most of my earnings on ice cream waffles. The best part? Now I know how to win all the games at the fair.

Maggie Furlong, West Coast Editor: My first job was a total dream. I was in high school and worked at a cute designer clothing boutique for a hilariously gruff man named Bunz (hi, Bunz!). I got a great discount, some free clothes and made way more money than anyone my age should ever make for folding tops and selling dresses to wealthy women. Full disclosure: I still have some of the clothes I got there in my closet. I won't say how long they've been there.

Tell us in the comments: What was your first job?