Last we shared, it looked like Rob Lowe wanted in on the seemingly never-ending series of negotiations for Miramax. But last week, the studio found itself flipping into another twist as reports revealed that executive Ron Tutor (along with Colony Capital) was closing in on the company, with a price tag that might just hit $700 million. This, in turn, angered Harvey Weinstein, a friend of CC president Tom Barrack.

With such a big price tag, you'd think Tutor must have had a change of heart about the movie industry after the fall-out with ex-partner David Bergstein ... but not quite. It seems this is purely about the money. Tutor could care less about cinema.

The Hollywood Reporter sat down for a long talk with Tutor about the many struggles with Bergstein and his continued involvement in Hollywood. Less than a year ago, he said he was done with Hollywood, but now Bergstein's out of the bidding war, and Tutor is front-and-center on a huge potential Hollywood deal. What changed? Was it the magic of Tinseltown and cinema. Nope. It's just a good business deal, he thinks.
Am I excited about making movies? No! Will we have no alternative but to make a certain level of movies? The answer is yes because a library of this magnitude will require it. But I'm still not enamored of the 'movie business.' What I like is that in a business sense, this is a particularly good library, and I like it.
If Harvey was ticked off at the thought of a friend helping someone else outbid him, this might just add a little added zing to the wounds. There's nothing like potentially losing the company named after your parents to a man who doesn't like making movies.

Even if Tutor is successful, the fight won't be over. The Weinsteins have "an iron clad" exit agreement with the library, and any buyer needs to get their okay to make sequels out of the franchise movies in the library. Naturally, sources say that the brothers will not work with the group and okay these sorts of things, and sources from the buyers say that they "don't believe they need to work with the Weinsteins to do the deal or to make sequels."

How will Miramax fare in Tutor's non-movie-loving hands? That remains to be seen, as does what a "certain level of movies" means to a non-Hollywood type. Stay tuned!