It's only been in theaters for 24 hours, but M. Night Shyamalan's latest movie, 'The Last Airbender,' has already become a notorious talking point among moviegoers. The movie appears to have critics talking as well, many of whom were unanimous in their venom towards the movie.

But bad reviews are a part of the movie-making process; if you can't handle them, you're in the wrong business.

For the audience, however, we get to read a bad movie review on a Friday afternoon and quickly move past it. We don't have to worry about the embarrassment that comes with having your work publicly lambasted. That all happens behind closed doors in the far away land of Hollywood, and we can keep the humiliation limited to our imagination.

Well, not anymore. New York Magazine's Vulture blog had the guts to read some of the scathing 'Airbender' reviews to Shyamalan, and the result is as awkward as going over to a friend's house for dinner and watching their parents get into an argument. It's only been in theaters for 24 hours, but M. Night Shyamalan's latest movie, 'The Last Airbender,' has already become a notorious talking point among moviegoers. The movie appears to have critics talking as well, many of whom were unanimous in their venom towards the movie.

But bad reviews are a normal part of the movie-making process; if you can't handle them, you're in the wrong business.

For the audience, however, we get to read a bad movie review on a Friday afternoon and quickly move past it. We don't have to worry about the embarrassment that comes with having your work publicly lambasted. That all happens behind closed doors in the far away land of Hollywood, and we can keep the humiliation limited to our imagination.

Well, not anymore. New York Magazine's Vulture blog had the guts to read some of the scathing 'Airbender' reviews to Shyamalan, and the result was as awkward as going over to a friend's house for dinner and watching their parents get into an argument.
"Have you read the reviews for Last Airbender?
No, I haven't.

Well, are you aware of the reviews?
No, actually.

Well, for the most part, critics have not been kind. Are you just ignoring them? Will you read them this weekend? Have you just not had time?
Are you saying that in general they didn't dig it?

In general, no. Roger Ebert, who liked 'The Happening,' did not. The first line of his review is, ''The Last Airbender' is an agonizing experience in every category that I can think of and others still waiting to be invented.' How do you react to something like that?
I don't know what to say to that stuff. I bring as much integrity to the table as humanly possible. It must be a language thing, in terms of a particular accent, a storytelling accent. I can only see it this certain way and I don't know how to think in another language. I think these are exactly the visions that are in my head, so I don't know how to adjust it without being me. It would be like asking a painter to change to a completely different style. I don't know."
Yikes. And it just goes on like that.

As we've learned, Shyamalan incites strong opinions from our readers, but this interview seems to indicate that he is completely unaware of the negativity that surrounds his movies. When actually presented with this information, he was as blindsided as a deer in headlights. We weren't even there when the interview took place -- all we've done is read through the transcript -- and we cringed so much that we thought about leaving the room for a few minutes.

The only way this could have been more embarrassing for him is if the writer who asked him these questions was a girl he liked in high school.

Related:
M. Night Shyamalan Faces His Toughest Critic: Our Kid Interviewer