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Roger MooreThis geezer's 'avin a giraffe, innee? Sir Roger Moore, retired James Bond and king of the arched eyebrow, has come out railing against the disappearance of the Queen's English due to the influence of television.

Sir Roger, who has spent the last few years acting as a special ambassador for Unicef, told of his disappointment at the entertainment profession's lack of posh accents whilst hosting an event for the charity.

"You have to have a regional dialect to get anywhere these days," the 82 year old said in his opening speech. "Deborah, my daughter, complains she is always being turned down for parts because she is not regional in her speech, which is a great pity."

Read more about Sir Roger's comments after the jump... Roger MooreThis geezer's 'avin a giraffe, innee? Sir Roger Moore, retired James Bond and king of the arched eyebrow, has come out railing against the disappearance of the Queen's English due to the influence of television.

Sir Roger, who has spent the last few years acting as a special ambassador for Unicef, told of his disappointment at the entertainment profession's lack of posh accents whilst hosting an event for the charity.

"You have to have a regional dialect to get anywhere these days," the 82 year old said in his opening speech. "Deborah, my daughter, complains she is always being turned down for parts because she is not regional in her speech, which is a great pity."

Moore continued: "I think it is probably the fault of television. You don't hear what we used to call 'West End actors' voices' on series like Holby City, Casualty and The Bill. I notice, too, on the children's programmes they are all talking 'a bit like that,' and that's encouraging the next generation to talk in this so-called 'estuary English' we have now. I think it is sad that proper English is disappearing. I don't see why it went out of fashion."

Well, the beautifully-voiced actor does have point but, sadly, it seems he's fighting a losing battle, particularly when it comes to television. Even Mark Thompon, the BBC's Director General, declared a couple of years ago that 'received pronunciation' was out of date and TV and radio should have more regional accents.