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Howard Marks and Rhys Ifans attends screening of Mr Nice at the Edinburgh International Film FestivalThis year's Edinburgh Film Festival has drawn its share of criticism for a lacklustre programme and for showcasing a weak field of Brit pictures competing for the Michael Powell Award. However the prizes, announced last night, happily put the focus on the triumphs and achievements of the 12-day event, rather than the disappointments.

Winning the Michael Powell Award for Best New British Feature is Skeletons, from Nick Whitfield. Andrew Buckley and Ed Gaughan star as ghostbusters who banish their clients' past misdeeds from their metaphorical closets. A Special Mention was awarded to Edward and Rory McHenry's stop-frame WWII-themed puppet animation Jackboots On Whitehall: think a British Team America: World Police, set in 1940.

Best Performance in a British Feature went to David Thewlis for Mr Nice, which tells the story of legendary drug smuggler Howard Marks. We only hope that Rhys Ifans, who actually plays Marks, isn't too miffed at being pipped to the prize by his co-star in a supporting role.

Find out more winners after the jump and see what our highlights from Edinburgh were... Howard Marks and Rhys Ifans attends screening of Mr Nice at the Edinburgh International Film FestivalThis year's Edinburgh Film Festival has drawn its share of criticism for a lacklustre programme and for showcasing a weak field of Brit pictures competing for the Michael Powell Award. However the prizes, announced last night, happily put the focus on the triumphs and achievements of the 12-day event, rather than the disappointments.

Winning the Michael Powell Award for Best New British Feature is Skeletons, from Nick Whitfield. Andrew Buckley and Ed Gaughan star as ghostbusters who banish their clients' past misdeeds from their metaphorical closets. A Special Mention was awarded to Edward and Rory McHenry's stop-frame WWII-themed puppet animation Jackboots On Whitehall: think a British Team America: World Police, set in 1940.

Best Performance in a British Feature went to David Thewlis for Mr Nice, which tells the story of legendary drug smuggler Howard Marks. We only hope that Rhys Ifans, who actually plays Marks, isn't too miffed at being pipped to the prize by his co-star in a supporting role.

Best International Feature went to Ryan Piers Williams' Dry Land, about an American soldier (Ryan O'Nan) returning from a tour of duty in Iraq, and discovering he's unable to settle back into normal home life in smalltown Texas. The New Directors Award, sponsored by Moet, was given to Monsters, Gareth Edwards' widely admired fusion of road-movie romance and alien sci-fi.

Moviefone UK's own personal highlights of the festival include Debra Granik's Winter's Bone, which received a Special Mention in the New Directors category, and focuses on a 17-year-old girl in impoverished rural America trying to hold her family together after her father skips bail and they face being evicted from their home. Most riotously enjoyable screening was documentary The People Vs George Lucas, in which Star Wars fans vent their spleen at the recent interventions of the formerly venerated creator.

Among the British films premiering in Edinburgh, two strong themes emerged. One is male friendship, the other suicide, attempted suicide or assisted suicide. Karl Golden's Pelican Blood and Hattie Dalton's Third Star both ingeniously managed to combine these two themes as well as, respectively, birdwatching and camping.