Adam Sandler, Chris Rock, Rob Schneider and David Spade were all comedy prodigies in their 20s when Lorne Michaels tapped them for 'Saturday Night Live.' Twenty years later, they've decided to play 'Grown Ups'. Yes, the title's ironic. This SNL rat pack – along with Sandler flick regular Kevin ('I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry') James -- is absolutely expected to deliver laughs rude and crude (but not too lewd – note the PG-13 rating).

Then again, how childish can these guys be? Their wives are played by the likes of Salma Hayek, Maria Bello and Maya Rudolph (the latter fantastic in the comedy-drama 'Away We Go'); it's hard to believe these women would marry goofballs. But we can't imagine that troubled Sandler. Audiences, it should be noted, were able to buy the eternally awkward 'Opera Man' with Drew Barrymore ('The Wedding Singer', '50 First Dates') and Winona Ryder ('Mr. Deeds').

'Grown Ups' centers on L.A. talent agent Lenny (Sandler), suddenly reuniting with his teammates at the funeral of their former basketball coach. His old buddies are mostly fellow married-with-children types. For his part, New Agey Rob (Schneider) is devoted to healthy living, and naughty Marcus (Spade) is devoted to exactly the opposite. The reunion extends from the funeral all the way to a water park, where wackiness ensues (see trailer below).

Sandler's last effort -- Judd Apatow's 'Funny People' -- was a mixed bag: The box office wasn't blockbuster, but the film landed on the Best of 2009 lists of The New Yorker and A.O. Scott of The New York Times.

Will 'Grown Ups' please critics and audiences? Read some highlights from recent reviews. Adam Sandler, Chris Rock, Rob Schneider and David Spade were all comedy prodigies in their 20s when Lorne Michaels tapped them for 'Saturday Night Live.' Twenty years later, they've decided to play 'Grown Ups'. Yes, the title's ironic. This SNL rat pack – along with Sandler flick regular Kevin ('I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry') James -- is absolutely expected to deliver laughs rude and crude (but not too lewd – note the PG-13 rating).

Then again, how childish can these guys be? Their wives are played by the likes of Salma Hayek, Maria Bello and Maya Rudolph (the latter fantastic in the comedy-drama 'Away We Go'); it's hard to believe these women would marry goofballs. But we can't imagine that troubled Sandler. Audiences, it should be noted, were able to buy the eternally awkward 'Opera Man' with Drew Barrymore ('The Wedding Singer', '50 First Dates') and Winona Ryder ('Mr. Deeds').

'Grown Ups' centers on L.A. talent agent Lenny (Sandler), suddenly reuniting with his teammates at the funeral of their former basketball coach. His old buddies are mostly fellow married-with-children types. For his part, New Agey Rob (Schneider) is devoted to healthy living, and naughty Marcus (Spade) is devoted to exactly the opposite. The reunion extends from the funeral all the way to a water park, where wackiness ensues (see trailer below).

Sandler's last effort -- Judd Apatow's 'Funny People' -- was a mixed bag: The box office wasn't blockbuster, but the film landed on the Best of 2009 lists of The New Yorker and A.O. Scott of The New York Times.

Will 'Grown Ups' please critics and audiences? Here's some highlights from recent reviews.

Entertainment Weekly: "[T]his is a comedy about five ordinary wisenheimers just hanging out, trying to top each other with insults and catch a break from the families they (mostly) love. The big climax? Everyone goes to a water park! Diverting enough to get by, 'Grown Ups' is Adam Sandler growing up -- but not too much. Grade: B-"

USA Today: "[T]he humor seems to be aging along with the star. Sandler (who wrote the script) may still find flatulence and fat jokes funny, but unless you like to see men struggling with their bodily functions, the gross-out humor falls flat here."

'Grown Ups' trailer

'Grown Ups' showtimes and tickets
More 'Grown Ups' reviews at Rotten Tomatoes

Village Voice: "Though the uncynical goodwill that accompanies Sandler's work makes [this] less enraging than the toxic 'Couples Retreat,' it's one of those Sandler movies where the inevitable Steve Buscemi cameo passes for the highlight."

Hollywood Reporter: "Apparently sensing that even their awesome riffing abilities might come up short, at about the halfway point, the cast abruptly heads for a water park, allowing Sandler and the boys to do such shtick as pee in the wave pools and ogle Schneider's inexplicably bodacious daughters."

Roger Ebert: "It's all, as I said, pleasant and good-natured, but it feels too much as if all these nice people are trying to keep the conversation going. A comedy it is, but 'The Hangover' or 'Death at a Funeral' it isn't."

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