Naked girls, a cabin in the woods, lots of blood, and a good chase are all elements of a great 80's horror homage. The SuicideGirls get this, and have tapped into their inner scream queens for what they are dubbing the first "reality horror film," Suicide Girls Must Die!.

So what does that mean exactly? Take twelve unsuspecting hotties to a remote cabin in Maine for the weekend under the guise of a calendar photoshoot, and then start picking them off one by one -- well, not really -- but you get the picture. Their (often hilarious) reactions are all caught on camera, along with lots of boobs and even a hot tub makeout party. These aren't your typical girls though. You won't find your average bimbo with nary a tattoo or piercing to gawk at. While I could make the argument that alt beauty is becoming the mainstream now, the SuicideGirls' continued success proves that not everyone shares the same standard perceptions when it comes to what is pleasing to the eye.

I had the opportunity to talk with Sawa Suicide, director of the girls' new film, and the SuicideGirls' founder, Missy Suicide. We chatted about horror films, women in the genre, the difficulty in keeping something secret, and what's on tap next for the ladies. First Look Studios, who brought us Christopher Smith's mind bender Triangle, are releasing the film on DVD June 29th. You can pick up a copy of the unrated film over here. Hit the jump for more with Missy and Sawa.


SuicideGirls' founder Missy and Suicide Girls Must Die! director Sawa had been talking about creating a "reality horror film" for some time before they actually started getting down to business. Sawa was excited about the prospect of "staging horrific experiences to get genuine reactions out of the girls." Missy added some humor about choosing the "reality" route: "We didn't know how to write a horror script, and even if we did write one, some of the girls can't act." The girls cite films like The Magus and Ten Little Indians as inspiration for their story, which takes twelve unsuspecting girls into the woods for a photoshoot. Everything is fun and games until the girls start disappearing one by one -- and their reactions are caught on tape.

As you can imagine, the basis of any reality entertainment template is flexibility. "I had to change plans daily because there was no way to predict how people were going to react. Everything kept changing on a day-to-day basis, so we had to kind of keep recalculating our scheme," Sawa told me. Both Missy and Sawa related that the girls were all mostly appreciative of the experience, after the fact -- because thinking your friends are being killed off by scary hill people is kind of upsetting. Luckily, the girls mused, no one hated them afterward -- too much.

Sawa was able to easily roll with the punches as director. She has experience as a camera operator and assistant, and has worked with the camera crew on David Fincher's Zodiac among other films. She was excited to be part of a bigger production for the SuicideGirls -- allowing the team to explore things with more depth. On hand to assist was Grace's Paul Solet who helped craft some of the plotlines and The Wizard of Gore's Jeremy Kasten who assisted during post-production. But even though Sawa had access to the genre directors, the whole process become a little tricky: "While we were on shoot days, the girls couldn't really know if anything was going on. I wasn't able to work side-by-side with Paul -- it wasn't that kind of situation."

One girl in the film who stands out from the others is Amina Munster -- the SuicideGirl leading the photoshoot who everyone loved to hate. Her bitchy and confident demeanor kept the other girls on task and kept a few of the diva models in check (the scene with the bear cracked me up ... ). According to Missy, Amina was kinda-sorta in the know about what was happening and definitely amped up the 'tude accordingly -- but she was also subject to many of the twists and turns the film takes.

Because of the SuicideGirls' female-centric nature, I wondered if the girls thought that women are underrepresented in the horror genre. "I think more women horror fans are coming of age where they can start directing and start being more involved behind the scenes ... I think in the film industry overall, women are becoming more accepted behind the scenes," Missy explained. Sawa agreed with her and related it to her own experience as a camera assistant: "When I started as a camera assistant, I was probably one of the only females in the crew ... And now that all the media is changing, it's open to girls. I've started to work for many more women, and have seen more women on the directing and photography end .. I think it's all changing a lot right now. There's more of a forum for people to show their stuff." Missy added, "I think it's going to bring some interesting dimensions to the world of horror because women find different things to scare you with than men do."

Both girls are horror fans (much like the SuicideGirls' following and their other models). Sawa cites 80's camp classics as her favorite and explained her fear of The Exorcist -- a film that still haunts her to this day. "I was afraid to sleep for a year," she joked. Missy revealed that Salem's Lot terrified her as a kid: "Everyone has their first horror movie that sets them off and that was definitely mine."

The SuicideGirls plan on bringing more entertainment our way soon. Missy talked about the future and what's in store for fans: "I feel blessed every day that I'm able to continually challenge myself and to continually do new projects that highlight different aspects of the brand, of the company, the people that enjoy it, and the lifestyle ... I think we really wait for genuine inspiration to strike, so we'll see how things go in the future."

You can pick up a copy of Suicide Girls Must Die! when it hits DVD on Tuesday, June 29.