CATEGORIES Reviews
Look for thrills, chases, explosions and two of the best smiles in the movies today as the revved-up 'Knight and Day' comes to theaters. The two smiles are courtesy of Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz, of course, who star in this adrenaline-rushed spy movie that doubles as a romantic comedy.

In it, Cruise is a rogue secret agent who teams with Diaz, a wholesome Midwestern gal, when the two come in possession of the kind of new technology that drives international spies wild. Peter Sarsgaard is the pursuing federal agent and Paul Dano and Viola Davis are also on board for the ride. James Mangold ('Walk the Line') directed.

Critics, for the most part, wish the Cruise and Diaz romantic chemistry could have been developed more than it is in the movie, and that the action sequences and special effects, especially the CG effects, could have been toned down. The film is being released two days early on Wednesday, instead of the normal Friday, to get a jump on the upcoming Fourth of July weekend.

We shall see if an early 'Day' makes for a hit. Read what the critics have to say: Look for thrills, chases, explosions and two of the best smiles in the movies today as the revved-up 'Knight and Day' comes to theaters. The two smiles are courtesy of Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz, of course, who star in this adrenaline-rushed spy movie that doubles as a romantic comedy.

In it, Cruise is a rogue secret agent who teams with Diaz, a wholesome Midwestern gal, when the two come in possession of the kind of new technology that drives international spies wild. Peter Sarsgaard is the pursuing federal agent and Paul Dano and Viola Davis are also on board for the ride. James Mangold ('Walk the Line') directed.

Critics, for the most part, wish the Cruise and Diaz romantic chemistry could have been developed more than it is in the movie, and that the action sequences and special effects, especially the CG effects, could have been toned down. The film is being released two days early on Wednesday, instead of the normal Friday, to get a jump on the upcoming Fourth of July weekend.

We shall see if an early 'Day' makes for a hit. Here's what the critics say:

Associated Press: "'Knight and Day' is a refreshing reminder, though, of why (Tom Cruise) is a superstar: He has that undeniable charisma about him and he really can act, something for which he doesn't always get the credit he deserves."

Variety: "Shot, edited and choreographed in the whiplash style customary for most studio actioners, the fisticuffs, knife fights and shootouts here are surprisingly rough, even unpleasant, given the film's PG-13 rating. Consequently, for all its efforts to approximate a mildly tongue-in-cheek screwball tone, 'Knight and Day' rarely attains the effervescence of its forebears; gunshots and CG explosions keep bursting its champagne bubble."

Roger Ebert: "Have summer audiences been so hammered down by special effects that they require noise and fragmented visuals to hold their interest? Is it still possible to delight in a story unfolding with charm and wit? How many machine guns do you need in a romantic comedy? If you have charismatic stars like Cruise and Diaz and an A-List director, do you have to hedge your bets?"

'Knight and Day' trailer



The Hollywood Reporter: "The primary miscalculation in the film, directed by James Mangold from a screenplay by Patrick O'Neill, comes with those two stars. In a film that makes no pretense at the plausibility of any of the action, its makers are counting heavily on audience involvement with Cruise and Diaz. But the film never gives them quiet moments together. The film's one romantic line comes late in the game, when Diaz's June Havens, feeling the effects of a truth serum, declares that she'd like to have sex with Roy."

Chicago Tribune: "From Boston to Agent Miller's secluded Caribbean island to Austria to Spain and back again. Mangold jams his camera alarmingly close to his stars' faces, which gives the frenzied action sequences more a sense of vertigo than immediacy. The script, which could be called 'unfilmable' except for the fact that Mangold filmed it, zags and zigs along, the banter trapped in a wit-free zone."

Washington Post: "While Cruise was born to play the part -- a modern-day MacGyver who, by his own admission, has been trained to dismantle a bomb in the dark 'with nothing but a safety pin and some Junior Mints' -- it also seems just possible that the guy might be ever so slightly deranged. The actor's couch-jumping, Scientology-pumping past actually helps here, add a layer of unpredictability to a character who, in almost every other aspect, is a kind of Superman."

Philadelphia Daily News: "Watching 'Knight and Day' is like watching the Greatest Hits of '80s Tom. He pushes his shades down the bridge of his nose and peers over the lenses, Vogue-ing the poster for 'Risky Business.' Jumps on a motorcycle 'Top Gun'-style, co-star in tow. Does some daredevil driving à la 'Days of Thunder,' with a war whoop and breezy smile. (OK, that was 1990. But still.)"

Seattle Times: "'Knight and Day,' though credited to director James Mangold and screenwriter Patrick O'Neill, feels like a computer-generated assortment of random Hollywood action-movie scenes shuffled together, with the end result being an excuse for Cruise to don sunglasses and his now-familiar rakish grin. At least someone in the theater is grinning."

Entertainment Weekly: "But even the remarkable sight of bulls running through Spanish streets -- real bulls, real Spain, big budget -- is eclipsed by the monumental scale of the heads of Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz, the stars who play boy-secret-agent meets girl-next-door in this studied exercise in romantic spy-jinks. Jeepers, but their heads are big - Easter Island-statue big! In the very first shot of the very first scene, set in the Wichita, Kan., airport where Roy (Cruise) is in transit undercover, the entire horizon is momentarily blotted out by the back of the actor's noggin."