He's written cult classic films, novels of all genres, comic books, television shows, and is a master of martial arts. Judging by the majority of his work, anyone could be forgiven of being terrified to meet the man. The brutality exhibited within some of his stories hits you with a punch to the gut. It's unrelenting and filthy. On more than one occasion, I've felt the need to shower afterwards (The Night They Missed the Horror Show, I'm looking at you). But . . . he's the most genial fellow you can imagine. Oh yeah - and he wrote Bubba Hotep!

Joe R. Lansdale has racked up more awards than I should list here. Most notably, he's won the Bram Stoker award an astounding seven times. His works are generally laden with all manner of unseemly things, and set within the backwoods of East Texas. The League of Extremely Ordinary Gentlemen, a podcast I'm a regular on, had the extraordinary fortune to interview him at length recently. He's promoting the release of the Complete Drive-In, which collects all three of his stories of an all-night horror movie marathon gone straight to hell.

It's a meandering interview, I'll admit, one that takes on the tone of a tangent-ridden conversation more than a pointed question-and-answer. Lansdale was a great sport, however, and proved to be an expert raconteur. While we initially set out to talk briefly about the Drive-In before transitioning into Westerns (the ostensible topic of the night), well . . . I was behind the mic. Naturally, that means I kept re-directing the chat to all things horror. We were all over the place, enthralled by his tales of rabid puppies, racism, Jonah Hex, and his recollections of working with Don Coscarelli and Angus Scrimm.

Click past the jump for 2 hours of storytelling from Joe R. Lansdale.