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Scene from GhostI promised myself I wouldn't cry today. I lied. Truth is, it all seemed such a merry wheeze a few weeks back when I came up with the idea of listing the ten saddest movie moments ever. Now I'm a blubbering wreck in need of a hug.

To be honest, there's hundreds of scenes that could justify a place in this heart-breaking line-up (and feel free to let us know your favourites in the comments below). Special mention should go to some near misses though, such as the end of Kes (when the brother kills the bird), or the standing on the chairs bit in Dead Poets Society. Or what about the end of Brokeback Mountain... oh, here come the waterworks again.

Take a look below at the ten saddest movie scenes in movie history after the jump while I go and find some more tissues... blub. Scene from GhostI promised myself I wouldn't cry today. I lied. Truth is, it all seemed such a merry wheeze a few weeks back when I came up with the idea of listing the ten saddest movie moments ever. Now I'm a blubbering wreck in need of a hug.

To be honest, there's hundreds of scenes that could justify a place in this heart-breaking line-up (and feel free to let us know your favourites in the comments below). Special mention should go to some near misses though, such as the end of Kes (when the brother kills the bird), or the standing on the chairs bit in Dead Poets Society. Or what about the end of Brokeback Mountain... oh, here come the waterworks again.

Take a look below at the ten saddest movie scenes in movie history while I go and find some more tissues... blub.


Ghost (Sad bit: When Molly finally sees Sam at the end)
Admit it, you're crying already, aren't you? Sure the film's as corny as a, er, really corny thing, but that doesn't stop the tears from falling when Molly (Demi Moore) - whose boyfriend Sam (Patrick Swayze) is cruelly murdered at the beginning of the film - gets to see her true love one more time before he disappears off into the light. With the recent tragic early death of Patrick Swayze, this scene just feels even more emotional now too.



Million Dollar Baby (Sad bit: Maggie asks Frank to kill her)
Here's one that catches you out. For the most part, it's the uplifting tale of Maggie (Hilary Swank), an aspiring female boxer who convinces old trainer Frank (Clint Eastwood) to take her on and train her up. So far, so Rocky. The sucker-punch (sorry about that) comes after Maggie becomes paralysed following a fight and, from her hospital bed, asks Frank to end her misery. Needless to say, even Clint cries at this bit.



Cinema Paradiso (Sad bit: Adult Toto watches a reel of classic cinema snogs)
Deemed as one of the greatest foreign films of all time, Cinema Paradiso follows the life of a filmmaker called Toto who recalls his childhood when he fell in love with the movies at his village's cinema and formed a deep friendship with the elderly projectionist Alfredo (Philippe Noiret). Emotion oozes out of this classic throughout, but the moment that breaks the heart is when a grown up Toto discovers a gift from the now-dead Alfredo - a movie reel of classic cinematic kisses that were originally censored by the church. Ennio Morricone's wonderful score plays over the scene, and... sniff, that's all I can say about this one.



Titanic (Sad bit: Rose says she'll never let Jack go... she does though)
Come on now, you didn't think we could leave this one out do you? You don't become the second biggest film ever without getting a few things right - and Leonardo DiCaprio popping his clogs at the end is one of those moments. After one of the most memorable first dates of all time, Rose (Kate Winslet) and Jack (DiCaprio) find themselves freezing in the Atlantic with the boat gone. Jack gets something for Rose to climb on to but, oh dear, there's only room for one. Goodbye Jack... (Please note: we couldn't find the Jack dying scene below, so you'll have to make do with the Rose dying and rejoining him on the Titanic bit at the end).



Beaches (Sad bit: CC takes Hillary home to die)
There's a few 'best friend' movies that could take the top weepy award - such as Steel Magnolias or Terms of Endearment - but Beaches just about tops the pair of them. Childhood mates CC (Bette Midler) and Hillary (Barbara Hershey) share a long and arduous relationship at times, with many conflicts and much time spent apart, but, hey, this is what true friendship is all about. But when you start hearing Midler sing 'did you ever know that you're my hero...' you know you've reached that bit of the film when CC brings Hillary home from her hospital deathbed and the pair sit facing the sea as the sun sets...



Brief Encounter (Sad bit: Laura and Alec say goodbye... forever)
David Lean breaks out the stiff upper lips for his frightfully, frightfully restrained, yet emotionally charged examination of forbidden passions in 1940s England. Laura (Celia Johnson) and Alec (Trevor Howard) make eyes at each across a steamy railway platform while Rachmaninov blasts away in the background. Now that's a love story. But when the pair agree to call off the affair, they meet for one last time at the cafe in the station... but the moment is ruined by a gabbing friend of Laura's who turns up just as Alec leaves to catch his train. Clear off, grandma!



Up (Sad bit: Carl and Ellie's story at the beginning)
Most of the films in this tearjerker chart save it till the end to get the tears flowing - what made Up so wonderful was that they put their sad bit at the beginning. Encapsulated into five beautiful minutes comes the entire love story of Carl Fredricksen (Edward Asner) and Ellie as they meet, fall in love, get married, do up the house and dream of far-flung travels together. What has you bawling, of course, is the realisation that Carl will have to do the last bit on his own.



ET (Sad bit: Two sad bits, really. When ET dies, and the goodbye at the end)
Damn you, Steven Spielberg, and your mastery of cinematic emotions. How on earth can the simple tale of a boy called Elliott and his close friendship with a long-necked extraterrestrial lead to tears, tears and more tears? Well it just does, okay, such as the scene where Elliot is standing by the motionless body of his alien friend in the medical facility, or the flying bike ride in front of the moon, or what about their final farewell? We've said it before and we'll say it again... sniff... damn you, Steven Spielberg... (oh, and we've let the soothing tones of Neil Diamond guide you through our ET video below)



Bambi (Sad bit: When Bambi's mum dies)
You think of Disney and you think safe family-friendly fare... wrong! On more than one occasion now, the home of Mickey Mouse have thrown in some epic tragedy amongst the fun. We've had to endure Dumbo watching his mum get taken away, then Simba seeing his father trampled to death in The Lion King, but the saddest of all sad Disney moments has to be that scene from Bambi. I'm afraid we can't actually type what happens because it's so awful.



It's a Wonderful Life (Sad bit: George gets his life back at the end)
The big difference with the tears that flow at the end of this movie is that they are the happy version - and you probably deserve an uplifting ending after what's preceded this. The ultimate Christmas movie stars James Stewart as George Bailey, a self-professed failure who is saved from suicide by an angel that shows George what life would have been like without him. Let's just say that when he gets back with his family at the end and that bell rings on the Christmas tree, well, those new hankies that my auntie always sends as a present come in very handy.