What's with all the swashbuckling this summer? 'Robin Hood,' 'The Prince of Persia'? Bring on the state-of-the-art pyrotechnics. In short, we wanna see things blow up. Ah, but look who has just arrived, smelling of petrol and fine cigars. It's 'The A-Team,' just in time.

'The A-Team' brings back the most beloved and explosive-friendly TV mercenaries of the 1980s. The deck is the same: an ace ("Hannibal"), two wild cards ("Murdock" and "B.A. Baracus") and a really good-looking guy ("Face"). In NBC's old caper, they were Vietnam vets; the 21st century crew has just served in Iraq. The men reunite to bust some baddies who've framed them for counterfeiting. If memory serves, the only way these guys will beat back a charge of fraud is with a howitzer.

The film stars Liam Neeson as Hannibal – not the Liam Neeson who occasionally stars in classics on Broadway, but the Liam Neeson of 'Taken', a seriously righteous brute (for the record, we love both). UFC titleholder Quinton "Rampage" Jackson assumes the gold chains of B.A. Baracus (the role that made Mr. T a star). Rounding out the team is Sharlto Copley of 'District 9' and 'The Hangover's' Bradley Cooper. Just in case you thought half the population lacked proper representation, Jessica Biel appears as the ex-girlfriend of Face (Cooper). The film was co-written and directed by Joe Carnahan, a specialist in macho yarns ('Smokin' Aces', 'Blood, Guts, Bullets and Octane').

Did 'The A-Team' bring their "A game"? Read what the critics have to say. What's with all the swashbuckling this summer? 'Robin Hood,' 'The Prince of Persia'? Bring on the state-of-the-art pyrotechnics. In short, we wanna see things blow up. Ah, but look who has just arrived, smelling of petrol and fine cigars. It's 'The A-Team,' just in time.

'The A-Team' brings back the most beloved and explosive-friendly TV mercenaries of the 1980s. The deck is the same: an ace ("Hannibal"), two wild cards ("Murdock" and "B.A. Baracus") and a really good-looking guy ("Face"). In NBC's old caper, they were Vietnam vets; the 21st century crew has just served in Iraq. The men reunite to bust some baddies who've framed them for counterfeiting. If memory serves, the only way these guys will beat back a charge of fraud is with a howitzer.

The film stars Liam Neeson as Hannibal – not the Liam Neeson who occasionally stars in classics on Broadway, but the Liam Neeson of 'Taken', a seriously righteous brute (for the record, we love both). UFC titleholder Quinton "Rampage" Jackson assumes the gold chains of B.A. Baracus (the role that made Mr. T a star). Rounding out the team is Sharlto Copley of 'District 9' and 'The Hangover's' Bradley Cooper. Just in case you thought half the population lacked proper representation, Jessica Biel appears as the ex-girlfriend of Face (Cooper). The film was co-written and directed by Joe Carnahan, a specialist in macho yarns ('Smokin' Aces', 'Blood, Guts, Bullets and Octane').

Did 'The A-Team' bring their "A game"? Let's see what the critics have to say.

The Hollywood Reporter : "The film lurches from one action sequence to another, with little connection between the sequences. The characters move directly from small to big screen with new actors, of course, but little else changed including their famous catchphrases. So the screenwriting as such has been reduced to storyboards, stunt rigging and visual effects."

Roger Ebert: "To give it credit, the movie knows it is childish. The PG-13 is appropriate. There's little actual gore, no sex beyond a chaste kiss, no R-rated language, but ohmigod, there's smoking! Alert to pre-teens: Try one of those fat cigars Hannibal smokes, and you won't feel like eating dinner."

'The A-Team' trailer

'The A-Team' showtimes and tickets
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Detroit Free Press: "[Director] Carnahan and his merry crew tiptoe the tightrope of campy nostalgia but never quite slip into travesty. The team's old van makes a dramatic entrance and a comic exit. No one says, 'I pity the fool.' A couple of the TV series' stars pop up in brief cameos, as does a contemporary TV icon. All in all, it's satisfying B-movie nonsense."

Chicago Tribune: "[ ... ] I respectfully suggest that more violent isn't always more compelling. My viewpoint on this matter is directly addressed by Neeson's Hannibal, who at one point reminds one of his A-Teammates: 'Overkill is underrated, my friend.'"
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