'Get Him to the Greek' is the latest feature to come out of the Judd Apatow-produced comedy machine. In this one, British comedian Russell Brand reprises his role as the booze-soaked rock demigod Aldous Snow, first seen stealing scenes in 2008's 'Forgetting Sarah Marshall.'

Brand's 'Marshall' and 'Greek' costar Jonah Hill, however, does not play the same character. Rather, the 'Superbad' star plays an up-and-coming record executive tasked (by Sean Combs, a.k.a. 'Diddy') to drag Snow out of his bacchanalian British environs and escort him to the 'Today' show in New York and then to Los Angeles' Greek Amphitheater to play a 10th anniversary concert. As is usually the case when earnest do-gooders, road trips and British bawdiness meet, high jinks and hilarity ensue.

Written and directed by 'Sarah Marshall' helmer Nicholas Stoller, the film also counts Elisabeth Moss, Rose Byrne and Colm Meaney (who plays Snow's estranged father) among its supporting cast. But will this Brand-Hill starrer spur audiences to 'Greek' out on this movie at the box office? Read what the critics had to say: 'Get Him to the Greek' is the latest feature to come out of the Judd Apatow-produced comedy machine. In this one, British comedian Russell Brand reprises his role as the booze-soaked rock demigod Aldous Snow, first seen stealing scenes in 2008's 'Forgetting Sarah Marshall.'

Brand's 'Marshall' and 'Greek' costar Jonah Hill, however, does not play the same character. Rather, the 'Superbad' star plays an up-and-coming record executive tasked (by Sean Combs, a.k.a. 'Diddy') to drag Snow out of his bacchanalian British environs and escort him to the 'Today' show in New York and then to Los Angeles' Greek Amphitheater to play a 10th anniversary concert. As is usually the case when earnest do-gooders, road trips and British bawdiness meet, high jinks and hilarity ensue.

Written and directed by 'Sarah Marshall' helmer Nicholas Stoller, the film also counts Elisabeth Moss, Rose Byrne and Colm Meaney (who plays Snow's estranged father) among its supporting cast. But will this Brand-Hill starrer spur audiences to 'Greek' out on this movie at the box office? Here's what the critics had to say:

Entertainment Weekly
: "A clever rock-world satire, with some lively take-offs on the TMZ-gossip magazine circus, but it's also too long, and by the time of the inevitable Las Vegas sequence, it starts to grow repetitive. The movie isn't, in the end, in the top drawer of Judd Apatow productions, as 'Forgetting Sarah Marshall' was. It's closer to a more flaked-out (and interesting) 'Pineapple Express.' Aldous Snow was actually more hilarious when he had less time on screen."

Roger Ebert
: "There are really two movies here. One is a gross-out comedy that grows lyrical in its exuberant offensive language, its drug excesses, its partying, its animal behavior. The other movie, which comes into focus, so to speak, in the last half, is surprisingly sweet. ... Under the cover of slapstick, cheap laughs, raunchy humor, gross-out physical comedy and sheer exploitation, 'Get Him to the Greek' also is fundamentally a sound movie.

Orlando Weekly
: "A raucous riff on 'My Favorite Year,' crammed full of cameos and zingers and topped off with a carefully calculated, scene-stealing performance by Combs. Hill is every bit the affable nitwit, an ideal target for the talent's increasingly inconvenient demands, while Brand brings back the bawdy charm that made him 'Sarah Marshall's secret weapon. ... ['Greek'] goes for the heartstrings by way of the rectum and feels sorely uneven as a result."

'Get Him to the Greek' trailer

The Hollywood Reporter: "The stop-start R-rated excursion never achieves the propulsive traction and outrageous/endearing balance that made 'The Hangover' such a smash this time last year. Lacking a sturdier venue, the fat boy and the bad boy are at best opening acts in a moviegoing season powered by headliners."

Orlando Sentinel
: "Might be this year's 'The Hangover.' ... 'Get Him to the Greek' is a generally giddy double dose of debauchery, a sequel to 'Forgetting Sarah Marshall,' where Aldous (Brit comic Russell Brand) first met Aaron."

The Austin Chronicle: "Episodic and spasmodically funny: Good jokes and gags perk up otherwise rambling and sometimes misbegotten sequences. The film feels like a collection of sketches instead of a mad, three-day, drug-and-sex-infused whirl."

Chicago Tribune: "
Extremely raunchy, 'Get Him to the Greek' is also very funny. Like the film that first paired Jonah Hill and Russell Brand, 'Forgetting Sarah Marshall,' the new comedy is unexpectedly sincere about the thing that matters most in a relationship: trust. It is also creatively diverse in exploring the ways boy-men -- a misbehaving rock star on drugs, and his star-struck, increasingly addled handler -- will be boy-men."

The Arizona Republic: "
Like many Apatow productions, 'Greek' doesn't quite know when to stop, and things aren't brought to a particularly satisfying resolution. ... But as an encore for Brand's Aldous, it's a welcome return. And for Hill, it's a chance to really shine."

The Miami Herald: "Isn't really a story but a collection of comic set pieces -- as if Apatow were atoning for his emphasis on character in 'Funny People,' which no one seemed to like. ... The picture is crude, slight and lingers in your memory about as long as a waft of bong smoke. The way this summer movie season is going, though, even the least bit of substance is enough to make a film feel like 'Citizen Kane.' "
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