CATEGORIES Features


If you read Friday's list of the top 25 fight scenes of all time, we're sure there are some hardcore cinephiles among you going: "Where is 'Equilibirum'?!", "How could you completely ignore Gun Kata?!," and "Where is the unique Gun Kata skills of 'Equilibrium?!" Well, settle down -- because in addition to listing the greatest of all time, Moviefone is shining a spotlight on those underrated battles that deserve wider recognition.

We used the same criteria for this list of fight scenes, only we focused on international films that didn't get worldwide distribution, and films that just didn't really leave a mark on the box office.

So let's take your first look at the best fight scenes you've never seen.

If you read Friday's list of the top 25 fight scenes of all time, we're sure there are some hardcore cinephiles among you going: "Where is 'Equilibirum'?!", "How could you completely ignore Gun Kata?!," and "Where is the unique Gun Kata skills of 'Equilibrium?!" Well, settle down -- because in addition to listing the greatest of all time, Moviefone is shining a spotlight on those underrated battles that deserve wider recognition.

We used the same criteria for this list of fight scenes, only we focused on international films that didn't get worldwide distribution, and films that just didn't really leave a mark on the box office.

So let's take your first look at the best fight scenes you've never seen.

5. River Tam vs. An Entire Bar in 'Serenity' (2005)
Joss Whedon's big-screen adaptation of his too-quickly-canceled space Western TV show 'Firefly' didn't have much more success at finding a bigger audience. It's a shame that more movie-watchers have not yet had the chance to see River Tam in action. Played by classically trained ballerina Summer Glau, River is a child prodigy/government programmed assassin, and after unwittingly being exposed to a subliminal message prompting her to fight, we finally get to see how deadly she can be.


Read the Rotten Tomatoes Reviews.

4. The Final Fight in 'Fist of Legend' (1994)
With this remake of the 1972 film 'Fist of Fury,' Jet Li had the difficult task of stepping into a role played by the legendary Bruce Lee. Set during tense Chinese-Japanese relations during the Shanghai International Settlement, the film became one of Li's first critical successes and a worthy successor to Lee's legacy. The film was only a minor hit at the Hong Kong box office, yet it created a demand for more realistic fight choreography in the action genre. It also attracted the attention of the Wachowski Brothers, who hired the the film's choreographer, Yuen Woo-ping, to stage the fights for 'The Matrix.' His American breakthrough work later led to mind-blowing choreography on films like 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon' and the 'Kill Bill' series.


Read the Rotten Tomatoes Reviews.

3. The Final Fight in 'Drunken Master' (1978)
With Yuen Woo-ping in the director's chair, this comedic kung-fu film served as one of Jackie Chan's earliest box-office successes. With Chan playing a young student who learns about a secret style of martial arts known as "The Eight Drunken Immortals," the film popularized the Zui Quan style of martial arts, -- also known as drunk boxing. The film is an early example of Chan's desire to mix martial arts with slapstick comedy.


Read the Rotten Tomatoes Reviews.

2. The Final Fight in 'Equilibrium' (2002)
Any sci-fi action film dealing with an emotion-stifling dystopia was bound to suffer from 'Matrix' comparisons, which is just what happened to this Christian Bale-driven movie. What makes this film so notable is the development of its own martial art: "Gun kata." Inspired by the hybrid use of martial arts and handguns in notable Hong Kong films like the work of John Woo, 'Equilibrium's' director Kurt Wimmer developed his own vision for a futuristic fighting style.


Read the Rotten Tomatoes Reviews.

1. The One-Take Fight in 'The Protector' (2006)
The highlight of Tony Jaa's Muy Thai-fighting style film -- about a young man on a quest to rescue his family's stolen elephants -- is this one-take fight scene going floor after floor of an entire building. It took 5 full takes over a one-month period to shoot the scene. Its time we shut up, and you just watched it.


Read the Rotten Tomatoes Reviews.