CATEGORIES Reviews
Glamorous as ever, our favorite high heel-wearing, martini-sipping Manhattanites -- Carrie (Sarah Jessica Parker), Miranda (Cynthia Nixon), Charlotte (Kristin Davis) and Samantha (Kim Cattrall) -- are all back in 'Sex and the City 2.' The once-famously single ladies, though, have all managed to procure a ring from their respective suitors -- well, except Samantha, who just plainly loves the noncommittal, single life.

Stressed out from the varied, daily complications of work and married life, Samantha and her three gal pals take up an offer from a Middle Eastern producer to fly them out for the PR launch of his new hotel in Abu Dhabi. Conflict soon ensues as their New York lifestyle of provocative fashion causes an uproar on the conservative Arabian sands. Also, Carrie unexpectedly runs into Aidan (John Corbett), which leads to a date and more. The question now becomes: Should she tell Big (Chris Noth) about it, and possibly rattle their nearly settled, perfect union?

Unlike the mostly charmed applause for the first film, critics have refused to buy what writer-director Michael Patrick King is selling this time around. The consensus seems to be that the sequel fails to capture the true spark and nature of the much beloved, Emmy-winning show. Potentially a critic-proof sale at the box office, 'Sex and the City 2' might be able pull out a win over 'Prince of Persia' solely on the complete, undying support from the ravenous fans of the HBO show.

Read what the critics had to say. Glamorous as ever, our favorite high heel-wearing, martini-sipping Manhattanites -- Carrie (Sarah Jessica Parker), Miranda (Cynthia Nixon), Charlotte (Kristin Davis) and Samantha (Kim Cattrall) -- are all back in 'Sex and the City 2.' The once-famously single ladies, though, have all managed to procure a ring from their respective suitors -- well, except Samantha, who just plainly loves the noncommittal, single life.

Stressed out from the varied, daily complications of work and married life, Samantha and her three gal pals take up an offer from a Middle Eastern producer to fly them out for the PR launch of his new hotel in Abu Dhabi. Conflict soon ensues as their New York lifestyle of provocative fashion causes an uproar on the conservative Arabian sands. Also, Carrie unexpectedly runs into Aidan (John Corbett), which leads to a date and more. The question now becomes: Should she tell Big (Chris Noth) about it, and possibly rattle their nearly settled, perfect union?

Unlike the mostly charmed applause for the first film, critics have refused to buy what writer-director Michael Patrick King is selling this time around. The consensus seems to be that the sequel fails to capture the true spark and nature of the much beloved, Emmy-winning show. Potentially a critic-proof sale at the box office, 'Sex and the City 2' might be able pull out a win over 'Prince of Persia' solely on the complete, undying support from the ravenous fans of the HBO show.

Here's what the critics had to say:

Entertainment Weekly
: "It's of passing interest to note that all the male characters who make return visits -- including John Corbett as Carrie's ex, David Eigenberg as Miranda's husband, Evan Handler as Charlotte's husband, and Jason Lewis as Samantha's actor boy-toy -- are so nice and mild and understanding and accommodating that they fade into invisibility. 'SATC2' doesn't have time to follow any relationships other than those among Carrie, Samantha, Charlotte, Miranda, and their suitcases full of costumer Patricia Field's caftan-themed creations. As Carrie might type on her laptop while giving one of her girly little shrugs, 'When did "Sex and The City" become so long and mean so little?'"

Roger Ebert
: "All of this is pretty thin gruel. The movie shows enterprise, and flies the entire cast away to the emirate of Abu Dhabi, where the girls are given a $22,000-a-night suite and matching Maybachs and butlers, courtesy of a sheik who wants to have a meeting with Samantha and talk about publicity for his hotel. This sequence is an exercise in obscenely conspicuous consumption, in which the girls appear in so many different outfits they must have been followed to the Middle East by a luggage plane. I don't know a whole lot about fashion, but I know something about taste, and these women spend much of the movie dressed in tacky, vulgar clothing."

L.A. Times: "King might have done well to borrow from some of those classic Arabian tales. Instead, the script is at its weakest when he takes a stab at burka jokes and the lives of the women confined to them. In general, the film's Muslim sendups fall into two categories: painfully clichéd or cringe-worthy. 'Bedouin, Bath & Beyond' is bad enough, but 'the real housewives of Abu Dhabi'? Really? Ironically, the nicest moments -- Miranda and Charlotte confessing their parenting woes, Big turning into a very believable homebody, Aidan talking about his three sons -- are the least typical of 'Sex and the City' fare, yet the most in touch with American midlife realities. Cattrall has the toughest go of it with Samantha too sad and too shrill in her menopausal misery, a pity."


Slant Magazine
: "It's not an unrealistic assessment, but it's still Cosmopolitan-deep philosophizing, and when their saviors take off their burkhas to reveal that they buy the latest Madison Avenue fashions, you have to laugh at how King trivializes female experience by conflating Western and Middle-Eastern cultural mores, absurdly linking the fashionista to the feminist freedom fighter and suggesting that women can only relate to each other if they share the same taste in clothes. The film's protagonists may never give their Muslim sisters a second thought again, but they're deeper than that. King's fascist, superficial assessment of their intelligence insults them as the women we came to know them as on television, and no doubt has (Susan) Sontag turning in her grave."

Time Out New York: "Under the rule of this formidable foursome, the big, bad Middle East becomes a menopausal Westerner's delight. One wrongheaded jaw-dropper follows another, from Samantha's description of a gay manservant as 'Paula Abdu' to a comic climax in which the ladies escape an angry male mob by wearing hijabs and abayas given to them by like-minded Muslim women. And the featherbrained feminism the franchise specializes in reaches its apex when Carrie files her latest book ('I Do. Do I?') beside Susan Sontag's 'Against Interpretation.' How do you say "In your dreams, girlfriend" in Arabic?"

Village Voice: "I get that 'dignity be damned' is a mantra for writer-director King, who wants to let us know, every five minutes, that he just loves women. But it's one thing to create a group of BFFs who have become, in their way, post-millennium pop female icons as beloved as Mary Richards and Rhoda Morgenstern were in the late 1970s. It's quite another to drag them well into middle age, dress them like mutton passing as lamb, and lumber them with female troubles culled straight from the mommy or single lady blogs."

Salon: "It's offensive to an entire audience who came of age with these women and who remain breathtakingly loyal, and out of nostalgic affection may not have the heart to turn away from them. It's offensive to King's own creations, toward whom he now seems to feel nothing but contempt. It's offensive because it keeps cattle-driving a franchise once based on sparkle and economy toward new heights of painful, frantic emptiness. I kept telling myself, over and over, that Carrie, Samantha, Miranda and Charlotte -- the real, flawed, funny, recognizably human ones, not these lobotomized zombie replacements -- would never do anything so dumb."