As I've been predicting all year, the closer we got to the release of Prince of Persia, the more announcements we would see regarding video game adaptations. Whether or not these films end up getting made depends on the success of Disney's Arabian adventure, but video games are the next logical go-to well of ideas for an industry obsessed with adapting properties that already have a pre-established brand identity and fan base. Even if Persia doesn't soar at the box office, I'd still expect to see more studios acquiring the rights to games in its wake. Last week it was Heavy Rain, this week it's Mass Effect's turn.

If you ask me, this is nothing but great news. BioWare's space-bound RPG has a rich storyline that could nicely transition to the big screen, so it's certainly a ripe candidate for a film. What elevates this to great news, however, is who is involved. The studio currently sitting on the film rights is none other than Legendary Pictures, a studio that has proved year-in and year-out (since Batman Begins) to be both fan friendly and film friendly. They're the deep pockets who let Christopher Nolan do whatever the hell his mad scientist brain wants. They're the ones who finally saw a Watchmen film to completion. If anyone should be bringing the adventures of Commander Shepard to big screen, it should be these guys.

As for who they've actually hired to bring those adventures to life, so far the duties rest with producers Avi and Ari Arad, Thomas Tull and Jon Jashni and screenwriter Mark Protosevich. I haven't been the biggest fan of most film's with Protosevich's name in the credits, most notably I Am Legend, but the consistent refrain from those who read scripts on a regular basis is that his drafts are always leagues better than what we're given once more writers are brought on board. So until Legendary Pictures starts hiring more writers to tweak Protosevich's early drafts, I think we're in good hands.

If you have no idea what Mass Effect is about, I'll just let the trailers for parts one and two speak for themselves: