Michelle Williams and Ryan Gosling at Cannes Film Festival 2010This year's Cannes isn't exactly overwhelmed with recognisable Hollywood names, so I made a point of seeing Blue Valentine today, starring Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams (pictured here arriving in Sunny Cannes). It was playing in the Un Certain Regard sidebar, its relatively lowly berth attributable to the fact that.the film has already premiered in Sundance.

It's a highly affecting US indie flick about a nurse (Williams) and a house painter (Gosling) and their young daughter, flashing back to how they first met and got together. It's one of several films in Cannes to feature quite raunchy sex, which may prove a selling point at the box-office.

Find out more from day 6 at Cannes after the jump... Michelle Williams and Ryan Gosling at Cannes Film Festival 2010This year's Cannes isn't exactly overwhelmed with recognisable Hollywood names, so I made a point of seeing Blue Valentine today, starring Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams (pictured here arriving in Sunny Cannes). It was playing in the Un Certain Regard sidebar, its relatively lowly berth attributable to the fact that.the film has already premiered in Sundance.

It's a highly affecting US indie flick about a nurse (Williams) and a house painter (Gosling) and their young daughter, flashing back to how they first met and got together. It's one of several films in Cannes to feature quite raunchy sex, which may prove a selling point at the box-office.

In the last 24 hours I've also seen two more films in the official Competition: Certified Copy from Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami, and Of Gods & Men by France's Xavier Beauvois. The former plays out like a more intellectual version of Richard Linklater's Before Sunrise and Before Sunset, as Juliette Binoche and William Shimell (an opera star in real life) wander around Tuscany chewing the fat.

The latter is the true story of a community of French monks in North Africa, who came under threat from Islamic guerillas fighting a civil war. Both films stand a chance of eliciting some kind of prize from the jury.

We are now more than half way through the Festival, and it's a good time to take stock of the international critics surveyed by trade paper Screen International. Critics from eight countries award each Competition title a mark from 0 to 4, and all the scores are recorded in a chart, which gradually gets filled in as the festival progresses. So far Mike Leigh's Another Year is way in the lead with a 3.4 average. Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's Biutiful, which many had tipped before seeing as a hot title, is way behind with 1.9.

Bottom of the heap so far is Japan's Takeshi Kitano Yakuza blood-fest Outrage, with an average of 0.9 out of 4. I found it juvenile, but the gore quotient - weapons include chopsticks and a dentist's drill - should entertain genre fans.