Russell Crowe and Danielle Spencer attend the Robin Hood Premiere at the Palais des Festivals during the 63rd Annual Cannes International Film FestivalTwenty-fours after arriving in Cannes, and your reporter's score is four movies, one party and zero celebrity interactions. Which, frankly, suits him just about fine.

First screening was yesterday afternoon's press showing of Ridley Scott's Robin Hood, the official opening night film of the festival. It's solidly entertaining, elevated by a strong cast and the star power of Russell Crowe, sporting a look that recalls his Gladiator glory days. The film was originally going to be called Nottingham, with events seen from the Sheriff's point of view, but the script has evidently journeyed far from that concept, since Nottingham (Matthew MacFadyen) is hardly in it, and the chief antagonists are King John (Oscar Isaac) and a traitorous fellow called Gregory (Mark Strong).

Find out more from the first day at the Cannes Film Festival after the jump... Russell Crowe and Danielle Spencer attend the Robin Hood Premiere at the Palais des Festivals during the 63rd Annual Cannes International Film FestivalTwenty-fours after arriving in Cannes, and your reporter's score is four movies, one party and zero celebrity interactions. Which, frankly, suits him just about fine.

First screening was yesterday afternoon's press showing of Ridley Scott's Robin Hood, the official opening night film of the festival. It's solidly entertaining, elevated by a strong cast and the star power of Russell Crowe, sporting a look that recalls his Gladiator glory days. The film was originally going to be called Nottingham, with events seen from the Sheriff's point of view, but the script has evidently journeyed far from that concept, since Nottingham (Matthew MacFadyen) is hardly in it, and the chief antagonists are King John (Oscar Isaac) and a traitorous fellow called Gregory (Mark Strong).

Maid Marion Loxley was originally going to be played by Sienna Miller, who would have been woefully miscast as the character seen here: the feisty farmer/widow/love interest is much better suited to Cate Blanchett. Scott was unable to attend last night, as he's recovering from knee surgery, but the stars were there on the red carpet, and at the after-party at the Majestic Beach, which I braved the rain to attend.

Robin Hood isn't competing for the Palme D'Or, but I've seen two of the Competition entries so far: On Tour, directed by French actor Mathieu Amalric (Quantum Of Solace), and Chonqing Blues, from Chinese director Wang Xiaoshuai (Shanghai Dreams). I doubt either film will be getting much attention from the jury, headed by Tim Burton. On Tour is about a troupe of American burlesque dancers touring French coastal towns, and features performers with great names such as Kitten On The Keys and Dirty Martini, but it lacks focus and oomph. Chonqing Blues is about an absent father returning to investigate the events leading to the death of the grown-up son he abandoned 14 years earlier.

Recently added to the Competition line-up is British director Ken Loach's Route Irish, and bookmaker Paddy Power has already tipped it as favourite to win the Palme D'Or, with odds of 3/1. Loach won in 2006 with The Wind That Shakes The Barley. Also favoured are Biutiful, from Alejandro Gonzales Inarritu, who previously made Amores Perros and Babel, and Another Year, from Britain's Mike Leigh. Leigh won the Palme D'Or in 1996 for Secrets And Lies, but his Vera Drake was rejected by Cannes six years ago, going on to win the top prize in Venice.

More from me tomorrow...