Filmmaker Nicole Holofcener ('Friends With Money') has money on her mind again in 'Please Give.' In it, Catherine Keener plays Kate, a Manhattan urbanite who buys furniture at estate sales and marks it up for a huge profit at her posh store. The problem? Kate feels guilty about it and about her desire for expensive things.

Then there's her troublesome teenage daughter (Sarah Steele), her possibly straying husband (Oliver Platt) and the neighbors (Ann Guilbert, Rebecca Hall and Amanda Peet) to further complicate things.

'Please Give' is an introspective and comedic look at what happens when the abundance of modern life meets today's guilty conscience. Reviewers find it relevant and telling -- read what they say after the jump. Filmmaker Nicole Holofcener ('Friends With Money') has money on her mind again in 'Please Give.' In it, Catherine Keener plays Kate, a Manhattan urbanite who buys furniture at estate sales and marks it up for a huge profit at her posh store. The problem? Kate feels guilty about it and about her desire for expensive things.

Then there's her troublesome teenage daughter (Sarah Steele), her possibly straying husband (Oliver Platt) and the neighbors (Ann Guilbert, Rebecca Hall and Amanda Peet) to further complicate things.

'Please Give' is an introspective and comedic look at what happens when the abundance of modern life meets today's guilty conscience. Reviewers find it relevant and telling -- here's what they say:

Variety: "If the characters' baggage at times feels rather neatly parceled out, the film nonetheless refreshes with its willingness to probe attitudes and ideas often deemed too insignificant, too much the stuff of normal life, to explore in any depth on film. Pic is also welcome for offering no shortage of choice distaff parts, all of which -- with the obvious exception of Peet's shallow, beauty-obsessed Mary -- are played with a conspicuous lack of vanity or conventional glamour."

Salon.com:
"I see Holofcener as something closer to a younger, female-centric Woody Allen, meaning that she's a social satirist whose essentially dark vision is cloaked (sometimes thinly) as comedy."

Newark Star-Ledger: "With her scratchy voice and haphazard style, Keener beautifully captures a certain kind of reflexively oversensitive, upper-middle-class type -- a woman who, instead of asking 'Do these jeans make my butt look big?' worries 'Does this Escalade make my values look shallow?'"

'Please Give' trailer


The Hollywood Reporter: "Everyone here is stressed about something but none of their travails seems terribly significant or revelatory about the human condition. Peet and Steele take physical appearances much too seriously. Peet, a spa worker specializing in facials, is a devotee of the tanning salon while Steele obsesses over every zit."

Time Out New York: "When the movie meanders, as you know it will, to a straying-husband subplot and Kate's own quest for purpose, you sigh and wish Holofcener had recognized the two-hander she might have crafted instead: a film about different generations of women surviving in the city."

New York Magazine: "Holofcener's plotting can seem casual (many characters, no speeches pointing up the themes, no conventional climaxes), but her dialogue is smart, an oscillating mixture of abrasiveness and balm, of harsh satire and compassionate pullback."

CATEGORIES Reviews