Welcome to Rocky Springs, where the smallest of creatures have created extra-large problems. In the McMansion development at the center of 'Furry Vengeance,' Oregon suburbanites trying to tame the wild find that life's a living heck ('Vengeance,' ahem, is rated PG.)

Brendan Fraser stars as Dan Sanders, a successful builder who has been tasked to level a forest for Rocky Springs, a brand new upscale community. No one is angrier about these plans than the forest's current tenant, a crafty raccoon. Working with a posse of anamalia neighbors, the raccoon hounds Sanders with some bruising pranks, hoping the construction team will head for the hills -- or away from the hills. This slapstick ode to Mother Nature is brought to you by Roger Kumble, best known for much naughtier fare ('Cruel Intentions' and 'The Sweetest Thing.')

Comedy veteran Brooke Shields (who thought anyone would say that 30 years ago?) co-stars as Fraser's wife. Shields told Moviefone this week she hopes kids find 'Vengeance' so funny that "their bellies hurt" from laughing. It was quite clear Fraser was tickled just talking about the film on 'The View' in a loopy-but-charming appearance this week.

Pre-tween customers -- and Brendan Fraser himself -- might find that 'Vengeance' satisfies, but what about the critics?

Read what they have to say after the jump. Welcome to Rocky Springs, where the smallest of creatures have created extra-large problems. In the McMansion development at the center of 'Furry Vengeance,' Oregon suburbanites trying to tame the wild find that life's a living heck ('Vengeance,' ahem, is rated PG.)

Brendan Fraser stars as Dan Sanders, a successful builder who has been tasked to level a forest for Rocky Springs, a brand new upscale community. No one is angrier about these plans than the forest's current tenant, a crafty raccoon. Working with a posse of anamalia neighbors, the raccoon hounds Sanders with some bruising pranks, hoping the construction team will head for the hills -- or away from the hills. This slapstick ode to Mother Nature is brought to you by Roger Kumble, best known for much naughtier fare ('Cruel Intentions' and 'The Sweetest Thing.')

Comedy veteran Brooke Shields (who thought anyone would say that 30 years ago?) co-stars as Fraser's wife. Shields told Moviefone this week she hopes kids find 'Vengeance' so funny that "their bellies hurt" from laughing. It was quite clear Fraser was tickled just talking about the film on 'The View' in a loopy-but-charming appearance this week.

Pre-tween customers -- and Brendan Fraser himself -- might find that 'Vengeance' satisfies, but what about the critics?

LA Weekly: "The animals here don't talk; that's the movie's one saving grace. Fraser is put through the ringer though -- I've never felt sorrier for an actor."

Entertainment Weekly: "It's nice [...] that hip comic actors dropped by for small roles, among them Angela Kinsey from 'The Office' and 'The Daily Show's' Samantha Bee. I wonder, did these ladies take the gigs so their own kids could see Mommy in a movie in which a man learns to be green while his groin turns black and blue? Grade: C"

'Furry Vengeance' trailer


'Furry Vengeance showtimes and tickets
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Associated Press: "No animals may have been hurt in this production, but Brendan Fraser was. That he bothers with films like this is dispiriting because of his talent, as evidenced by movies like 'The Quiet American' and 'Crash.' Those films made use of his smiley demeanor for a superficial cover, not just vacant broad comedy."

Arizona Republic: "The problem with 'Furry Vengeance' and with director Roger Kumble's narrative is not that it's stupid, that Dan can be throttled one minute, for instance, and fine the next. That's not ideal, mind you, but it can be overcome with humor. Ah, but there is no humor here. Instead, there is a mean-spirited vibe that is at first off-putting and eventually exhausting. If your idea of fun is to continually watch a man fall off a roof, get stung by bees, sprayed repeatedly by skunks, chased by a bear and -- here's a good one -- dumped upside down in a portable toilet, well, you're in luck."

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: The finale, poached from 'Animal House,' tries to excuse the buffoonery with an environmental message. But the message that needs to be posted at the theater door is 'No trespassing.'"

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