Dorothy Provine, an actress who was equally at home playing a blonde bombshell or the girl next door, died April 25 from emphysema at Hospice of Kitsap County in Bremerton, Wash. She was 75.

Provine was probably best-known for her role as Pinky Pinkham in "The Roaring '20s," a Chicago-set period crime drama that ran on ABC from 1960-62, in which she played a leggy flapper in the fictitious Charleston Club in New York City, and for starring roles in 'The Bonnie Parker Story' (1958) and Stanley Kramer's 'It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World' (1963). Dorothy Provine, an actress who was equally at home playing a blonde bombshell or the girl next door, died April 25 from emphysema at Hospice of Kitsap County in Bremerton, Wash. She was 75.

Provine was probably best-known for her role as Pinky Pinkham in "The Roaring '20s," a Chicago-set period crime drama that ran on ABC from 1960-62, in which she played a leggy flapper in the fictitious Charleston Club in New York City, and for starring roles in 'The Bonnie Parker Story' (1958) and Stanley Kramer's 'It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World' (1963).

Provine was born in Deadwood, S.D., on January 30, 1935, and attended the University of Washington. After moving to Los Angeles in 1957, she won the role of Bonnie Parker, then went on to a series of movies and TV shows, including 'The 30 Foot Bride of Candy Rock' (1959), 'Good Neighbor Sam' (1964), 'The Alaskans,' '77 Sunset Strip,' 'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,.' 'The Great Race' (1965) and 'That Darn Cat!' (1965).

In 1968 she married TV director Robert Day and soon retired from acting. In the late '70s the pair moved to Bainbridge Island in Washington state.

Provine is survived by her husband and one son.

CATEGORIES Movies