CATEGORIES Movies
Dame Helen MirrenSpeaking at an event in Los Angeles to celebrate the achievements of British artists in America, Dame Helen Mirren has hit out at the typecasting of British actors as villains.

"I think it's rather unfortunate that the villain in every movie is always British, we're such an easy target that they can comfortably make the Brits the villains."

Dame Helen, who won the Best Actress Oscar in 2007 for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II in The Queen, said it was "important to let Americans know that we're not just the Royal family – there's a lot more to us than that".

Keep reading after the jump to find out more... Dame Helen MirrenSpeaking at an event in Los Angeles to celebrate the achievements of British artists in America, Dame Helen Mirren has hit out at the typecasting of British actors as villains.

"I think it's rather unfortunate that the villain in every movie is always British, we're such an easy target that they can comfortably make the Brits the villains."

Dame Helen, who won the Best Actress Oscar in 2007 for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II in The Queen, said it was "important to let Americans know that we're not just the Royal family – there's a lot more to us than that".

"It's just nice to say we're not snooty, stuck-up, malevolent, malignant creatures as we're often portrayed. We're actually kind of cool and hip! I love the idiosyncrasy of the British people, I love the eccentric nature," the 64-year-old added.

The problem is, of course, that we Brits are just good at being bad. Take Alan Rickman, after star turns in Robin Hood and Die Hard (where admittedly he played a German) he can't help but play baddies, even when he's a nice family man like in Love Actually, he still cheats on his wife. And then there was Anthony Hopkins eating people in Silence of the Lambs.

Mind you, other countries can have just as much cause for complaint. How about Russia? After all those Bond villains and Mickey Rourke's Whiplash in the upcoming Iron Man 2, or Ireland who have had their fair share of badly accented villains (Sin City, Patriot Games, The Devil's Own).

If Dame Helen does want to point the finger at anyone, perhaps Mel Gibson should be looking shifty after his double whammy of 'evil English' films with Braveheart and The Patriot. He sure showed us.

What do you think, do the British make better villains than everyone else or is it time for a change?