Here's a happy Earth Day present from Disneynature: 'Oceans,' which opens today, delves into our seas as never before, thanks to state of the art film technology that provides unique glimpses of the creatures living in and around our oceans. 'Oceans' even includes satellite images to illustrate the harmful affects of pollution.

The work is the latest from the studio responsible for 'Earth' and is directed by Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud, the team behind the Oscar nominated 'Winged Migration.'

Narration is provided by Pierce Brosnan.

Viewers can look forward to a close up of a blue whale, armies of spider crabs and a peek at a female walrus and her pup, all in vivid detail. The critics are all but mesmerized by 'Oceans.' Here's what they say: Here's a happy Earth Day present from Disneynature: 'Oceans,' which opens today, delves into our seas as never before, thanks to state of the art film technology that provides unique glimpses of the creatures living in and around our oceans. 'Oceans' even includes satellite images to illustrate the harmful affects of pollution.

The work is the latest from the studio responsible for 'Earth' and is directed by Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud, the team behind the Oscar nominated 'Winged Migration.'

Narration is provided by Pierce Brosnan.

Viewers can look forward to a close up of a blue whale, armies of spider crabs and a peek at a female walrus and her pup, all in vivid detail. The critics are all but mesmerized by 'Oceans.' Here's what they say:

Orlando Sentinel : "It's still a movie of marvels, with many images so stunning as to trick the mind into thinking 'special effects.' But the movie magic here -- mammals and fish, corals and crustaceans so strange, whimsical and blessedly numerous -- is all Mother Nature's own."

Village Voice: "Taking us from the reefs of Australia to South Africa's shark-infested coves and Alaska's orca feeding grounds, 'Oceans' is a jaw-dropper as a visual travelogue -- even its anthropomorphic indulgences (an ocean floor is turned into a rough neighborhood, complete with trespassers and shy weirdos) are winning."

Associated Press: "It's not just the images themselves that are striking, but also the way in which they're pieced together. Perrin and Cluzaud, who also directed the Oscar-nominated documentary 'Winged Migration,' have crafted a nonfiction film that's shot and edited like a feature. They make us feel an emotional connection as we watch the intimacy of a female walrus delicately caring for her pup, or the heartbreaking sight of baby sea turtles scurrying across the sand for their tiny lives just moments after being hatched. (This would be a good time to urge you to bring tissues.)"

'Oceans' trailer

Los Angeles Times: "The most arresting thing about 'Oceans' is how unexpectedly bizarre many of the creatures that live deeper under the sea than either Charlie the Tuna or 'The Little Mermaid's' Ariel actually look. Invaders from the deepest part of outer space couldn't seem any stranger and, aside from specialists, most people will have no idea living things this outré exist."

Hollywood Reporter:
"Unlike 'Earth,' which tied together its amazing footage with extensive voice-over and anthropomorphic animals, 'Oceans' opts for straight-faced nature. As a result it's more a poetic mood piece than a narrated story and probably a little more difficult for young children to stay focused on."

New York Times: "Moving from the infinitesimal to the gargantuan -- from sea urchin larvae to 120-ton blue whales -- the filmmakers work tirelessly to parallel their undersea world with the larger universe, offering genteel reminders of our mutual dependence."

Time Out New York: "Still, the film's rigorous commitment to probing the undersea kingdom's oddities separates it from the usual tepid Discovery Channel fare, and those looking for marine exotica and savagery will thrill to a sea slug that shimmies like a flamenco dancer and an orgiastic feeding frenzy involving dolphins, sharks and a school of sardines."

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